Division of Infectious Diseases

Clinical Consequences of Contaminated Blood Cultures in Adult Hospitalized Patients at an Institution Utilizing a Rapid Blood-Culture Identification System

Blood culture contamination results in prolonged hospital length of stay, inappropriate use of antibiotics, and increased cost as well as the associated adverse events such as falls, drug errors, and healthcare associated infections (adverse events that may occur during more prolonged hospital stay) and emergence of antibiotic resistance, C. difficile infection, and antibiotic side effects (adverse events associated with unnecessary antibiotic administration). However, nearly all… Continue Reading

We are HIRING! Unique Community ID Opportunity Tailored to Your Professional Interests

Here @UNMC_ID we are always excited for the opportunity to grow our Division, and below you will find our announcement of a new position we have! The Division of Infectious Diseases at the University of Nebraska Medical Center in Omaha, NE is recruiting a Community ID physician to join our growing faculty.  This opportunity can be customized to fit your professional interests – whether clinical,… Continue Reading

Antibiotics At the End-of-Life: Helping or Harming?

Content written by Dr. Clayton Mowrer. Early in my medical training, my father developed a rapidly-progressive type of cancer. Over the course of several months, his health declined quite quickly, and he was spending more time in the hospital than outside of it. It became uncomfortably clear that pushing forward with invasive and toxic interventions would cause him much more harm and discomfort than it… Continue Reading

Journal Club: Should vancomycin be given as prophylaxis for Clostridioides difficile infections?

The following is a review by one of our fellows, Dr. Randy McCreery, who at a recent journal club presented a paper by Johnson, et al.: Effectiveness of Oral Vancomycin for Prevention of Healthcare Facility-Onset Clostridioides difficile Infection in Targeted Patients During Systemic Antibiotic Exposure, Clinical Infectious Diseases, 28 September 2019. In addition, Drs. McCreery, Cawcutt, Cortes-Penfield & Van Schooneveld published a letter to the editor… Continue Reading

COVID-19 – What is UNMC ID doing?

Although it has not been officially declared a pandemic by the World Health Organization (WHO), as of this morning, there were 81, 191 confirmed cases of COVID-19 and 2,768 deaths worldwide. To date, 57 of these cases are within US borders, and there are increasing cases throughout the world. UNMC & Nebraska Medicine have had our quarantine and biocontainment units active and caring for patients… Continue Reading

Freedom is in the Air: My Visit to Sudan, a Born-again Country

Here at UNMC ID, we are thrilled to share the global, and personal efforts, of our faculty. Please take a moment to read this excellent piece by Dr. Nada Fadul; Associate Professor, Division of Infectious Diseases, UNMC Sudan felt different this time. It was the middle of December 2019, the first anniversary of the Sudanese Revolution that caught the world’s attention. The country is going… Continue Reading

Should We Add Daptomycin to β-Lactams in the Initial Treatment of Methicillin-susceptible S. aureus Bacteremia?

Content from Dr. Razan El Ramahi, originally posted in IDSA journal club.  Despite the availability of active antibiotics to treat Staphylococcus aureus bacteremia (SAB), controversy still exists regarding the optimal antibiotic strategy and whether combination antibiotics improve outcomes. In small clinical studies, a possible benefit was observed by adding daptomycin to β-lactams in the treatment of SAB. However, the numbers of methicillin-susceptible S. aureus (MSSA) cases in these studies, published… Continue Reading

Novel Coronavirus – What You Need to Know Now

Content courtesy of Dr. Angela Hewlett Coronaviruses are common respiratory pathogens, and generally cause mild symptoms of the ‘common cold’.  However, other coronavirus strains have been known to cause outbreaks that lead to more severe disease like pneumonia, and even death.  Examples of these include SARS and MERS, which are both coronaviruses with mortality rates of 10% and 34%, respectively. Here is a newly published… Continue Reading