Division of Infectious Diseases

Re-Opening Sudan Amidst the COVID-19 Pandemic

Content provided by Dr. Nada Fadul. Sudan emerged from a 30-year dictatorship in 2019 to face the COVID-19 pandemic with a fragile health system and a half-finished transitional government structure. During the dictatorship, the majority of GDP was spent on military and security forces and very little was spent on health. This led to privatization of healthcare and a near complete collapse of the previously… Continue Reading

The Future of ID Training – UNMC ID Participate in Development of IDSA Antimicrobial Stewardship Curriculum

Content written by Drs. Van Schooneveld and Stohs. Antimicrobial stewardship programs improve patient outcomes, efficiency of care, and are a key tool in combating antimicrobial resistance. The field of antimicrobial stewardship is rapidly expanding and while ID fellows have the foundation for leading antimicrobial stewardship efforts, leading such programs require unique skills and knowledge. To meet this need, in 2016 the Infectious Diseases Society of… Continue Reading

VAE – A Perpetual Prevention Problem

Ventilator-Associated Events (VAEs) were adopted by the National Health Safety Network (NHSN) in 2013, and have subsequently been associated with worse patient outcomes. However, the shift to VAE has left controversy as to both its value, and how best to prevent it. Recently, Zhu et al published a large study focused on risk factors and outcomes from VAEs. This study again demonstrated worse outcomes for… Continue Reading

COVID Vaccine Trial – Update & Future Adolescent Opportunities

The University of Nebraska Medical Center and Nebraska Medicine are participating in an international clinical trial to evaluate the safety and effectiveness of Novavax COVID-19 vaccine for adults.  Novavax vaccine is a protein-based vaccine from the coronavirus spike protein and is adjuvanted with saponin-based Matrix-M™ to enhance the immune response and stimulate high levels of neutralizing antibodies. It does not contain live virus, it cannot replicate, nor cause… Continue Reading

New Faculty Spotlight – Dr. Daniel Brailita

Background: I was born in Bucharest, Romania and completed Medical School there. I trained in Internal Medicine and Infectious Diseases in Texas, finishing as chief resident at Texas Tech and chief fellow at UT Southwestern in Dallas. I moved to Nebraska in 2007 where I helped building the first ID practice encompassing Central Nebraska and Tri-Cities area. My family and I enjoyed the Nebraska Nice… Continue Reading

Why I Love ID – Dr. Richard Hankins

It has been a hot minute since we had a chance to share the perspective of our faculty on why they love ID. Dr. Hankins was able to share as a fellow, but now shares his updated reasons from the perspective of a junior faculty member. “When thinking of why I love infectious diseases, I always find a multitude of reasons, and just seem to… Continue Reading

To treat severe injection-related infections in people with substance use disorder, collaborate

Here’s a too-common infectious diseases consultation: A 30-year-old man comes to the ER with two weeks of fevers, chills, and back pain, plus increasingly difficult breathing for the past two days. He has injected opioids for the past five years. He has abscesses in the left arm, tenderness in the low spine, and a new heart murmur. His doctors obtain blood cultures, start IV vancomycin,… Continue Reading

A critical examination of the controversial study behind hydroxychloroquine and azithromycin for COVID-19

On March 20th, the International Journal of Antimicrobial Agents published Hydroxychloroquine and azithromycin as a treatment of COVID-19: results of an open-label non-randomized clinical trial by Gautret et al.  The president of the United States tweeted about the article the very next day, and on March 28th the FDA announced an emergency use authorization to allow the distribution of hydroxychloroquine and chloroquine from national stockpiles… Continue Reading

Should We Add Daptomycin to β-Lactams in the Initial Treatment of Methicillin-susceptible S. aureus Bacteremia?

Content from Dr. Razan El Ramahi, originally posted in IDSA journal club.  Despite the availability of active antibiotics to treat Staphylococcus aureus bacteremia (SAB), controversy still exists regarding the optimal antibiotic strategy and whether combination antibiotics improve outcomes. In small clinical studies, a possible benefit was observed by adding daptomycin to β-lactams in the treatment of SAB. However, the numbers of methicillin-susceptible S. aureus (MSSA) cases in these studies, published… Continue Reading