Month: January 2019

Prescribing in Pediatric Patients: Who is at Risk?

The following was previously posted by Dr. Marcelin to SHEA Journal Club published online in January 2019. In the inpatient setting, much of the broad-spectrum antibiotic prescribing occurs in the context of the sepsis syndrome, where uncertainty leads to overly broad empiricism. Development of antibiotic-resistant Gram-negative rods (high-risk GNRs) may complicate empiric treatment choices, and […]

January 31, 2019

Baloxavir Marboxil for Uncomplicated Influenza – Worth the Cost?

Influenza season is in full swing and with that, the discussions surrounding treatment are heating up! Dr. Hankins, a second year ID fellow, led our recent journal club discussion on Baloxavir. The New England Journal of Medicine article, Baloxavir Marboxil for Uncomplicated Influenza in Adults and Adolescents, discusses two randomized control trials, that were double-blinded for […]

January 28, 2019

It’s Getting Hot in Here: The Conundrum of Fever in the ICU

Fever has plagued mankind through the ages although was not until the 1600s when Thomas Sydenham reportedly first recognized that fever was an innate response” to get rid of the injurious agents causing the disease”. In the intensive care unit, fever is one of the most common abnormal signs documented and frequently results in changes […]

January 24, 2019

Global Burden of Tuberculosis: Are We Making Any Improvements?

UNMC is a proud to play a critical role in biopreparedness and global health, which also means we have to stay up-to-date on global health, including tuberculosis. In a recent Infectious Diseases journal club, Dr. Lawler presented the following 2018 Lancet article on the global burden of TB. Global, regional, and national burden of tuberculosis, […]

January 21, 2019

Decisive De-labelling in Cancer Patients: Just what the Doctor Ordered

The following was previously posted by Dr. Marcelin to SHEA Journal Club published online in January 2019. Although 10% of Americans report penicillin allergies, 90% of those allergies are not substantiated. Up to 25% of patients living with cancer report penicillin allergies, but more than half of these are low risk and could tolerate beta-lactams. […]

January 16, 2019

SeptiCyte: Is It Ready for Prime-time?

The following is a summary of a recent ID Journal Club, presented and written by 2nd year ID Fellow Dr. Raj Karnatak: Sepsis defined as “life-threatening organ dysfunction due to the dysregulated host response to an infection” [1]. Sepsis most commonly results from a bacterial infection, or less frequently from a fungal or viral infection. […]

January 9, 2019

Technology vs. Humans: Role of Rapid Diagnostics and Antimicrobial Stewardship in Cancer Patients

Rapid diagnostic testing (RDTs) plays an important role in Antimicrobial Stewardship Programs (ASP) and highlights the impact of the Microbiology laboratory on reducing inappropriate antibiotic use, particularly in hospitalized patients. Early microbial identification with RDTs can lead to earlier initiation of targeted antimicrobial therapy, which can in turn result in shorter hospitalization, fewer adverse events […]

January 3, 2019

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