Division of Infectious Diseases

Ongoing Debate on the Treatment of Staphylococcus aureus Bacteremia

Dr. Andre Kalil, our Director of Transplant Infectious Diseases, recently co-authored a reply to Geriak et al.: “Clinical Data on Daptomycin plus Ceftaroline versus Standard of Care Monotherapy in the Treatment of Methicillin-Resistant Staphylococcus aureus Bacteremia.” Debate around the findings of this article was recently featured by Dr. Razan El Ramahi in the IDSA ID journal club and on this blog. In their reply to… Continue Reading

Contraception and Antiretroviral Therapy: Important Interactions to Keep in Mind

Dr. Kimberly Scarsi recently published an important study in Lancet HIV: “Antiretroviral therapy and vaginally administered contraceptive hormones: a three-arm, pharmacokinetic study.”  We were excited to learn more about and feature her work! Could you please give us a brief summary of the study you performed? This was a pharmacokinetic evaluation of the effect of antiretroviral therapy (ART) on vaginally administered hormones. Overall, 84 women… Continue Reading

Blood culture contamination–it’s a big deal

Blood cultures are a key diagnostic test to detect bacteremia and appropriately treat patients with sepsis and are performed approximately 30 million times in the United States yearly. Unfortunately, contamination of blood cultures occurs in the 0.5% to 5% of samples (approximately 25% of positive blood cultures are due to contamination) which leads to inappropriate antibiotic treatment, additional unneeded tests, extended hospital length of stay,… Continue Reading

Unpacking the new IDSA Community-Acquired Pneumonia guidelines

We are always excited to have our ID fellows provide guest blog posts. Second year ID fellow Dr. Lindsey Rearigh (follow her on Twitter @LRearigh) was recently on her Antimicrobial Stewardship rotation and reviewed the latest published guidelines for Community-Acquired Pneumonia (CAP).  The American Thoracic Society (ATS) and Infectious Diseases Society of America (IDSA) recently released updated community-acquired pneumonia (CAP) guidelines. The first immediate implication… Continue Reading

Journal Club – Stewardship in Community Hospitals: How should we spend our limited resources? 

Stewardship in Community Hospitals: How should we spend our limited resources?  The following is a review by our ID Fellowship Program Director Dr. Trevor Van Schooneveld from our last Infection Control/Antimicrobial Stewardship Journal Club. He discussed the article by Anderson et al: Feasibility of Core Antimicrobial Stewardship Interventions in Community Hospitals. JAMA Network Open.  2019;2(8):e199369.   Antimicrobial stewardship is important to improving patient care and outcomes and numerous entities… Continue Reading

What to Expect in Antimicrobial Stewardship…Shorter is Better, Of Course!

The following was previously posted by Dr. Marcelin to SHEA Journal Club published online in February 2019. Electronic clinical decision support tools and rapid diagnostic testing have significantly impacted the way we practice Infectious Diseases. Despite these scientific gains, Antimicrobial Stewardship still requires an understanding of the behavioral science of prescribing. Prior studies have demonstrated that antibiotic prescribing may be influenced by specific behavioral interventions,… Continue Reading

Prescribing in Pediatric Patients: Who is at Risk?

The following was previously posted by Dr. Marcelin to SHEA Journal Club published online in January 2019. In the inpatient setting, much of the broad-spectrum antibiotic prescribing occurs in the context of the sepsis syndrome, where uncertainty leads to overly broad empiricism. Development of antibiotic-resistant Gram-negative rods (high-risk GNRs) may complicate empiric treatment choices, and in the pediatric population, delay in appropriate treatment can have… Continue Reading

Decisive De-labelling in Cancer Patients: Just what the Doctor Ordered

The following was previously posted by Dr. Marcelin to SHEA Journal Club published online in January 2019. Although 10% of Americans report penicillin allergies, 90% of those allergies are not substantiated. Up to 25% of patients living with cancer report penicillin allergies, but more than half of these are low risk and could tolerate beta-lactams. Cancer patients are likely to receive inappropriate antibiotics for a… Continue Reading

SeptiCyte: Is It Ready for Prime-time?

The following is a summary of a recent ID Journal Club, presented and written by 2nd year ID Fellow Dr. Raj Karnatak: Sepsis defined as “life-threatening organ dysfunction due to the dysregulated host response to an infection” [1]. Sepsis most commonly results from a bacterial infection, or less frequently from a fungal or viral infection. Sepsis is the most expensive condition treated in US hospitals… Continue Reading