Division of Infectious Diseases

How Clean is the Hub?

New UNMC ID publication alert! #ReadUNMCID Recently, several members of the Division of Infectious Diseases at UNMC/Nebraska Medicine published a study in American Journal of Infection Control (AJIC) entitled: Microbial colonization of intravascular catheter connectors in hospitalized patients. Drs. Richard Hankins (former ID fellow, class of 2019), and Kelly Cawcutt (Associate Medical Director of Infection Control) are the lead and senior authors on this study. … Continue Reading

A Day in the Life of Central Venous Access Devices

This post comes courtesy of Dr. Mark Rupp, who recently published a study in the Journal of Infusion Nursing about outpatient maintenance practices for central venous access devices (CVADs)! Our patients are increasingly receiving intravenous therapy at home via indwelling CVADs. However, limited data exist regarding patients’ experiences with outpatient CVADs. Regina Nailon is the lead author on a recently published paper in the Journal… Continue Reading

When you see CRE: Add Equal Parts Antimicrobial Stewardship and Infection Control

The following was previously posted by Dr. Marcelin to SHEA Journal Club published online in April 2019. Dealing with carbapenem resistant organisms presents both an antimicrobial stewardship and infection control problem. Richter et al. aimed to predict risk factors for carbapenem resistance among Gram-negative rods (CR-GNR). The authors were particularly interested in whether differences exist in risk factors for development of ertapenem-resistance (ER-GNR), versus resistance… Continue Reading

Learning Outside of the Comfort Zone

Several months ago, a five-person team from Nebraska Medicine’s Biocontainment Unit traveled to Western Uganda, where they trained refugee health workers on appropriate infection prevention and control practices. Dr. James Lawler, one of our Infectious Diseases Faculty, was the team leader on this trip. Dr. Lawler is the Director of International Programs and Innovation for the Global Center for Health Security,  and Director of Clinical and… Continue Reading

Earrings In Healthcare Workers: Friend or Foe?

Ear piercing among people, including healthcare workers, is a common trend. Katsuse et al, attempted to make a correlation between ear piercings and healthcare-associated infections. In order to prove this relationship, researchers sampled the earlobes and fingers of 200 nurses working at a university hospital. 128 of those nurses had pierced earlobes and 72 of the nurses sampled did not. When sampling the fingers, the… Continue Reading

Does the Clostridium Smell Diffy? Even the Dogs Disagree…

The C. difficile sniffing dogs are back! There are several prior reports of individual dogs being trained to “sniff out” C. difficile. In a novel approach, the authors of this study trained two dogs simultaneously, and then compared interrater reliability between sniff attempts. They used toxigenic C. difficile frozen stool samples (GDH EIA and PCR positive) and negative controls in an institution where prevalence of… Continue Reading

CRE or not CRE: A Question of Risky Business and Notes from the Field

The following was originally posted by Dr. Marcelin to the August 2018 SHEA Journal Club  Carbapenem-resistant Enterobacteriaceae (CRE) are not as prevalent in the United States as they are in the Eastern Hemisphere; however travel within our global village means creates opportunity for movement of these organisms to our region.  The following is a review of two studies on risk predictors for CRE and three “Notes… Continue Reading

Who’s going to #SHEA2018?

UNMCID is excited to participate in #SHEA2018 this week from April 18-20 in Portland, OR. This is going to be an exciting conference this year, featuring “Education on Innovative Topics Addressing Unanswered Issues in Healthcare Epidemiology, Antibiotic Stewardship, and Post-Acute & Long-Term Care“.  We want to be sure YOU know where to find us in Portland! Below is the list of faculty presentations, posters and… Continue Reading

Even after Thanksgiving, it’s still not too late to get your FLU SHOT!

It’s already the day after Thanksgiving, but believe it or not, it is still early in the flu season! The Douglas County Department of Health has been recording influenza cases since the beginning of the flu season, designated as October 1, 2017.  To date, there have been 96 laboratory confirmed influenza cases in Douglas County.  This is more than was reported for the same time-period in… Continue Reading