Publication Alert: Leveraging a Preexisting Global Infectious Disease Network for Local Decision Making During a Pandemic

The content below was provided by Jocelyn Herstein, an assistant professor at UNMC and Director of International Partnerships and Programs with the National Emerging Special Pathogens Training and Education Center. She led a recently published study, collaborating with UNMC ID faculty Drs. Angela Hewlett and James Lawler. 


What prompted this study?

Emerging infectious disease events require a rapid response from health systems; however, evidence-based consensus guidelines are generally absent early in emergency health events.

What does the GIDPN do?

In 2017, the Global Infectious Disease Preparedness Network (GIDPN) was formed by 5 high-level isolation units spanning 3 continents. In the early weeks of the COVID-19 pandemic, when information on the novel disease was frequently evolving and evidence-based guidelines were absent, the GIDPN was leveraged to rapidly exchange information, approaches, and experiences between the five units.

What is the take home message?

The networking facilitated by GIDPN allowed for rapid epidemiological and clinical decision-making in a local context. Shared knowledge led to earlier adoption of some treatment modalities as compared to most peer institutions and to implementation of protocols prior to incorporation into national guidelines. Networking of these specialized high-level isolation units have a role in enhancing preparedness for and response to future epidemics/pandemics. 


Jocelyn Herstein, PhD, MPH pictured left, led this project. She is assistant professor at UNMC and Director of International Partnerships and Programs with the National Emerging Special Pathogens Training and Education Center.

Read the full article here.

Citation: Herstein JJ, Lowe JJ, Wolf T, Vasoo S, Leo YS, Chin BS, Shen Y, Hewlett AL, Lawler JV. Leveraging a Preexisting Global Infectious Disease Network for Local Decision Making During a Pandemic. Clin Infect Dis. 2022 Mar 1;74(4):729-733. doi: 10.1093/cid/ciab660. PMID: 34318871; PMCID: PMC8406886.

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