McGoogan News

15% discount when publishing with BioMed Central

The library is now a Supporter Member with BioMed Central. UNMC faculty, staff, and students can now reap all the benefits of publishing a research article in an open access journal and receive a 15% discount on article processing charges. This is true regardless of the number of papers you publish.

When submitting a manuscript, either via a journal home page or via http://www.biomedcentral.com/manuscript/, you will be identified as belonging to UNMC and automatically granted a 15% discount on article processing charges if you are accessing the pages while on the UNMC campus. If you are at home or at an external terminal when submitting your paper, you can still claim this discount by stating your affiliation to UNMC.

BioMed Central publishes over 100 online journals, across the whole spectrum of biology and medicine. For a full list, please go to http://www.biomedcentral.com/browse/journals/

When you submit your research to any of our journals, it will receive rigorous and rapid peer review.  If your article is accepted:

  • It will be accessible to anyone with an Internet connection – open access means no subscriptions or ‘pay-per-view’ charges for original research articles.
  • It is more likely to be cited, as it will be freely available to the entire global biological and medical community
  • It will be listed in PubMed within days of publication
  • You retain the copyright of your work
  • You will be able to view your article’s access statistics, which average over 200 downloads per month per article
  • Your articles will be securely and permanently archived in PubMed Central

Vesalius exhibit now on display

By John SchleicherVesalius skeleton

A new display, featuring Andreas Vesalius, is now available on the 8th floor of the library.  Andreas Vesalius (1514-1564), was born on December 31, 1514.  He was the leading anatomist of his day, professor at the University of Padua in Italy, and he corrected some anatomical misinformation from the ancients such as Hippocrates and Galen.  See a story on him here.

Vesalius’ landmark work was De corporis humani fabrica libri septem (Seven books on the fabric of the human body), first published in 1543, with a second edition published in 1555.  The McGoogan Library owns a second edition, donated in 1959 by the estate of Goldie (Goddin) Potts, widow of John B. Potts, M.D, (1876-1948), Professor of Otolaryngology at the University of Nebraska College of Medicine from 1912 to 1937. He received his M.D. in 1907 from the College of Medicine.  According to a recent census in which we participated, there are 58 copies of the 1555 edition in 49 university and institutional libraries across the U.S.

Also on display on the 6th floor, behind the former reference desk area, is a two volume set, The fabric of the human body: an annotated translation of the 1543 and 1555 editions, by Daniel H. Garrison and Malcolm H. Hast, published in 2014.  This is a complete translation from the Latin, and facsimile of both the first and second editions which patrons can look through at their leisure.

New resources added to library collection

At the end of each fiscal year, we sometimes have some extra money that we can spend on the collection. This year, we had a small amount that we could use for a few purchases.

New journal subscription: Journal of Interprofessional Education & Practice

The Journal of Interprofessional Education & Practice, a quarterly journal that provides innovative ideas for interprofessional educators and practitioners through peer-reviewed articles and reports. Each issue examines current issues and trends in interprofessional healthcare topics, offering progressive solutions to the challenges facing the profession. The Journal of Interprofessional Education & Practice (JIEP) is affiliated with University of Nebraska Medical Center and the official journal of National Academies of Practice (NAP) and supports its mission to serve the public and the health profession by advancing education, policy, practice & research.

New membership: BioMed Central

The library recently became a supporter member of BioMed Central. With this membership, any UNMC author who publishes in a BioMed Central journal will receive a 15% discount on article processing charges. BioMed Central publishes over 100 open access journal across the whole spectrum of biology and medicine. Articles submitted to these journals receive rigorous and rapid peer review and authors retain the copyright of their work. More information will be released on this blog soon.

Archival rights: SpringerProtocols

We recently purchased the complete SpringerProtocols archive. In addition, each year we renew our subscription we will automatically receive archival rights to that year. Making a one-time purchase of the archive and switching to an archival rights model allows for more stability in our collection. SpringerProtocols is an online database of reproducible laboratory protocols in the biomedical and life sciences. Compiling protocols from the book series Methods in Molecular Biology and other sources, SpringerProtocols offers researchers access to nearly thirty years of tested, trusted, step-by-step protocols for immediate use in the lab. With an emphasis on comprehensiveness and clarity, each protocol is organized in an easily reproducible recipe style.

From the archives: Notes on nursing history

Engraving of Florence Nightingale (from a portrait), cover of the Trained Nurse and Hospital Review, Vol. LXX, No. 4, April 1923.
Engraving of Florence Nightingale (from a portrait), cover of the Trained Nurse and Hospital Review, Vol. LXX, No. 4, April 1923.

By John Schleicher

When we consider nursing history, most of us know the name Florence Nightingale (1820-1910). The library’s rare books collection includes the first British (1859) and the first American (1860) editions of Nightingale’s landmark work Notes on Nursing: What it is, and what it is Not.

Following Nightingale’s work in the 19th century, a number of other nursing innovators and educators, in the United States and other countries, wrote works dealing with the history and professionalization of nursing. Among these important works are:

  • Nursing: its Principles and Practice: for Hospital and Private Use (1893), by Isabel Hampton Robb (1859-1910)
  • A History of Nursing: the Evolution of Nursing Systems from the Earliest Times to the Foundation of the first English and American Training Schools for Nurses (four volumes, 1907-1912), by Mary Adelaide Nutting (1858-1948)
  • A Short History of Nursing: From the Earliest Times to the Present Day (1920), by Lavinia Dock (1858-1956).

Obvious from these titles, the history of nursing and evolution into a profession are very important to these authors.

To see more works on the history of nursing visit the library’s rare book rooms and history of medicine collection. Contact the Special Collections Department to schedule an appointment or inquire at the AskUs desk on the 6th floor of Wittson Hall.

Time to plant a garden … with the library

By Dawn Wilson

IMG_0229The cold, brutal Nebraska winter is over; it’s time to plant and try to keep those New Year’s Resolutions to live healthier.

Health and gardening have long been associated, be it the simple act of getting out into the sun and doing manual labor, or eating homegrown vegetables. Over the last few years, studies have even been conducted into the soil bacteria, mycobacterium vaccae, which may help raise serotonin levels and actually make people happier—just for playing in the dirt!

As a specialty library, instead of run-of-the-mill, “how to plant and when to water” books, we carry these unique titles:

Historical and Folklore Plant Information

Bizarre Plants by William A. Emboden – This book covers giant oddities, carnivorous plants, and even the magical properties associated with plants used in black magic ceremonies.

Folklore & Odysseys of Food & Medicinal Plants by Ernst and Johanna Lehner – Who knew the tomato had its own story? This book collects the histories of common foods in different cultures. For instance, the tomato has a long and glorious history wherein it was marketed in France as an aphrodisiac, but other portions of Europe grew them only ornamentally and never ate them, as they are relatives of nightshade, which is, of course, deadly.

Herbs for the Mediaeval Household: for Cooking, Healing and Divers Uses by Margaret B. Freeman – This is a fun little book put out by the Metropolitan Museum of Art in NYC, which includes historical woodcut illustrations dating back to the 1400s, and how herbs were used at that time for cooking, freshening clothing, and healing.

Early American Gardens: “For Meate or Medicine” by Ann Leighton – This book also includes historical illustrations from 1630s and covers topics ranging from Physick to making your garden fashionable by shaping your shrubberies into animals and geometrical designs.

The Folk-Lore of Plants by T. F. Thiselton-Dyer – First published in 1889, this book explores plants known to affect dreams and visions, plants believed to embody lightning, and the use of plants in love-charms.

Poisonous Plants by Robert E. Arnold, M.D. – Whether you’re planting or foraging, this full-color book is indispensable to teach the dangers of certain plants.

Further reading on modern medicinal plants, homeopathy, and alternative medicine

  • CRC Handbook of Medicinal Spices by James A. Duke
  • Handbook of Medicinal Herbs by James A. Duke
  • Herbal Medicines: A Guide for Health-Care Professionals by Carol A. Newall
  • The History of American Homeopathy: The Academic Years, 1820-1935 by John S. Haller, Jr.
  • Nurse’s Handbook of Alternative and Complementary Therapies