McGoogan News

Seeking participants for library website usability study

The McGoogan Library of Medicine is seeking volunteers to participate in a study of the library website. The purpose of this study is to identify new ways for the library to develop and organize information on our website that will meet the needs of our users. UNMC students, staff, and faculty are invited to participate in this study. The study will take place in person at the library and will require approximately 30 minutes to complete. Each participant will receive a $10 gift card.   
 
If selected, we will contact you. For questions about this study, please contact Heather Brown (hlbrown@unmc.edu).

If you are interested in participating, please fill out the following form so we can schedule a time to meet with you. 

 http://unmc.libwizard.com/usabilitystudy

Support websites currently unavailable

Due to a nationwide outage of Amazon Web Services, many of the library’s support websites are inaccessible. These sites include Research Guides and study room reservations. Though unknown, some publishers may host on AWS and may be unavailable. It is unknown how long this outage will last.

3D Printing in Medicine Seminar Series

The UNMC Makers Club will host experts in 3D printing and project development to speak about their research. All are invited to join in the discussion!

Gabe Linke, Children’s Hospital 3D Printing Coordinator
February 21, 2017, 12-12:50pm, MSC 2014

Dr. Donny Suh, Truhlsen Eye Institute
March 1, 2017, 12-12:50pm, MSC 4053

Dr. Jorge Zuniga, UNO Biomechanics
March 14, 2017, 12-12:50pm, MSC 2014

Dr. Bin Duan, Internal Medicine
April 5, 2017, 12-12:50pm, MSC 2014

Dr. Jesse Cox, Pathology
April 18, 2017, 12-12:50pm, MSC 2010

Lunch is provided (first come, first served). This seminar series is sponsored by UNMC Student Senate. Questions? Contact the Makers Club 3Dmakers@unmc.edu

 

From the archives: Early Public Health in Omaha

By John Schleicher

Omaha was founded in 1854, as soon as Nebraska Territory opened to settlement.  It was formally incorporated as a city on February 2, 1857, and was the territorial capital.  In 1855, the first physician in the city, Dr. George Miller, “busied himself in public city health matters.”  One of the first few ordinances passed by the new city government dealt with a public health issue—the disposal of dead animal carcasses that lay in the often very muddy streets.  Over the ensuing years, city leaders continued to concern themselves with public health out of necessity.

The March 1894 edition of the “Monthly Report of the Department of Health, Omaha” (see image), was still reporting the number and type of dead animals removed from the streets and from public and private property, which included horses, mules, cows, dogs, cats, colts, calves, and hogs.  This publication also listed communicable diseases reported in the city, including diphtheria, scarlet fever, measles, typhoid fever, diarrheal diseases, small pox, whooping cough, and puerpural sepsis.

At the granting of statehood, on March 1, 1867, the capital was removed to the new town of Lincoln, further west.  The local governments of both the City of Omaha and Douglas County continued to be aware of and concerned about the health of their citizens.  The library’s archives hold monthly reports of the Omaha Department of Health from March 1894 to 1903, and monthly and annual reports from 1938-1947, called the Health Bulletin, from the Omaha Bureau of Health.   Later, there was a health agency known as the Omaha-Douglas County Health Department.  The first Douglas County Hospital opened in 1887, and a City Emergency Hospital opened in 1912.