McGoogan News

Identifying predatory publishers

In this age of open access publishing, where authors to retain copyright and removes the paywall to potential readers, one must be aware that not all open access publishers are the same. Predatory publishers—those who distribute content solely to make money from article processing charges (APCs) –have little regard for peer review and what researchers typically expect from scholarly publishing processes.

But, how can you tell if a journal publisher is potentially predatory? It is a challenge: journal titles and publisher names are similar, reputable-looking articles front the website, and editorial boards looks to be full of experts from reputable institutions. You may have even received an invitation to submit a paper, complete with the convincing “hook” of knowledge about your work or field.

An article recently published in BMC Medicine tackles the issue of spotting the difference between potential predatory and legitimate biomedical journals. It highlights the typical characteristics of predatory journals, such as broad scope, errors in grammar and spelling, no retraction policy for submissions, and little or no mention of copyright. (All 13 characteristics are outlined in Table 10 of the article.)

In addition to these, consider whether a journal is indexed in MEDLINE, Scopus, or other major databases and whether all fees are clearly disclosed. Authors should look at the journal and publisher critically. The library’s Author Toolkit guide provides some pointers.

If you have questions about the quality of a journal, librarians can help. Please contact the AskUs Desk at 402-559-6221 or askus@unmc.edu for assistance.

3D Printing in Medicine Seminar Series April 5 & 18

The UNMC Makers Club will host experts in 3D printing and project development to speak about their research. All are invited to join in the discussion!

Dr. Bin Duan, Internal Medicine
April 5, 2017, 12-12:50pm, MSC 2014

Dr. Jesse Cox, Pathology
April 18, 2017, 12-12:50pm, MSC 2010

Lunch is provided (first come, first served).

This seminar series is sponsored by UNMC Student Senate. Questions? Contact the Makers Club 3Dmakers@unmc.edu

Davis History of Medicine Lecture April 11

The ninth annual Richard B. Davis, M.D., Ph.D. History of Medicine Lecture will be held Tuesday, April 11, 2017, noon, in the Michael F. Sorrell Center, room 1005.

Margaret Humphreys, M.D., Ph.D., Josiah Charles Trent Professor of the History of Medicine, in the School of Medicine, Duke University, Durham, North Carolina and Past President, American Association for the History of Medicine will speak on the Marrow of Tragedy: Medicine in the American Civil War. The Civil War was the greatest health disaster the United States has ever experienced, killing more than a million Americans and leaving many others invalided or grieving. Poorly prepared to care for wounded and sick soldiers as the war began, Union and Confederate governments scrambled to provide doctoring and nursing, supplies, and shelter for those felled by warfare or disease.

A boxed lunch will be available at 11:30 a.m.

NLM Spotlight: Community Health Maps Blog

The Community Health Maps Blog provides information about affordable Geographic Information Systems (GIS) mapping tools for use in collecting and visualizing public health trends through maps and spatial data. The blog is geared towards community-based organizations engaged in collecting information about the health of their communities. Since many community organizations may not have the resources for expensive GIS software or a fulltime GIS specialist, the blog focuses on tools that are low cost or open source.

The blog posts feature reviews of mapping apps and software; best practices for using the tools during data collection, analysis, and visualization; and experiences of groups who have implemented a mapping workflow into their projects. The blog also includes lab exercises to take a user through the Community Health Mapping workflow with step-by-step instructions for each of the tools involved. The labs are currently being updated to reflect recent changes in some of the software, and the new labs will be available this spring.

You can visit the Community Health Maps Blog at https://communityhealthmaps.nlm.nih.gov/. The blog is a collaboration between the National Library of Medicine, Center for Public Service Communications and Bird’s Eye View.

Want to learn more about the Community Health Maps blog and resources? Attend an upcoming webinar!

NNLM Resource Picks: Community Health Mapping
Wednesday, May 10, 2017 | 2:00 pm CT
To register and for more information: https://nnlm.gov/class/community-health-mapping/278

Legal reference and copyright classes on March 28

The following two classes are available in-person or live-stream. An archive of the classes will also be made available. Please register below.

 

Legal Reference and Research Resources for Medical Professionals & Educators

Instructor: Sandra B. Placzek, JD, MLIS, Assoc. Director and Professor of Schmid Law Library, UNL

Curious about the how to find that law or regulation that is frequently referenced – either in print publications or online? Ever wonder how laws or regulations are created? Spend the lunch hour with Professor Sandy Placzek, one of the reference librarians from the Schmid Law Library, and learn the basics of finding federal law: cases, statutes and regulations. Professor Placzek will be happy to answer questions on both Federal and Nebraska state law research.

Mar 28, WH8011, 12:00pm-1pm (livestream available)

REGISTER

Copyright for Educators: Questions and Answers on Fair Use in the Classroom

Instructor Richard Leiter, JD, MLIS, Director of the Schmid Law Library and Professor of Law, UNL

Mar 28, MCPH3013, 3:30-4:30pm (livestream available)

REGISTER