McGoogan News

In the library with an art collection

Haythorn Branding '96

Haythorn Branding '96

By Dawn Wilson

If you don’t have time to visit the Library of Congress in Washington, D.C. or even to take a trip to the Durham Museum, you can still satisfy your creative side by wandering around the McGoogan Library. Many of the same photographs that are on exhibit at the Library of Congress and at the Durham can also be found on permanent display at our Library. Dr. Charles W. Guildner, who graduated from UNMC in 1957, donated photographs from his “Lives of Tradition” collection to the Library. Dr. Guildner took up photography after he retired as an anesthesiologist.

The photographs, focusing on rural Nebraska, ranches in the Midwest, and the people who live and work there, are displayed on walls and in study rooms throughout both the 6th and 7th floors of the Library. Although the photographs are contemporary—they were taken over a seventeen year period, starting in 1990—they have a timeless and almost antiquated feel. The black and white images of unspoilt farming landscapes, showcasing people who still rely on ranching techniques that have changed little over the past two centuries, show little of the bustle of modern life and technological dependency found in the city. Instead, you will see timeless blizzards, farming using “six-abreast” horse teams, and men and women working at the hand-hewn ranch buildings built generations ago by their families.

On his website (www.guildner-photo.com), Dr. Guildner says he focused on “finding and recording people who are living and working in characteristic ways that have changed little since the settling of the heartland of this country.”

Each of the photographs on display in the Library are accompanied by an interpretive plaque where Dr. Guildner explains the scenes, the humble people, and his impetus for taking the photographs.

If the photographs on display in the Library whet your appetite to see more, you can visit the Durham Museum in downtown Omaha. There, you will find more photographs in the South Gallery, as well as donated camera equipment. Just take your UNMC ID card with you, as admittance for UNMC students, staff, and faculty is free thanks to a partnership between UNMC and the Museum.

 

New books added to the collection

  • 20 questions and answers about metastatic castration-resistant prostate cancer. WJ 752 El59t 2015
  • 100 questions & answers about lymphoma Peter Holman, Gregory Bociek, Jodi Garrett. WH 525 H747o 2016
  • Advanced surgical recall Recall, series editor and senior editor, Lorne H. Blackbourne; advisor, Curtis G. Tribble. WO 18.2 A244 2015
  • Atlas of human anatomy Frank H. Netter. QS 4 N474a 2014
  • Biostatistics: the bare essentials Geoffrey R. Norman, PhD, David L. Streiner, PhD. WA 950 N482p 2014
  • Building a medical vocabulary: with Spanish translations Peggy C. Leonard. W 15 L551b 2015
  • Business administration for clinical trials: managing research, strategy, finance, regulation, and quality R. Jennifer Cavalieri, Mark E. Rupp. QV 771 C313b 2014
  • Child and adolescent psychiatry for the specialty board review Hong Shen, Robert Hendren. WS 18.2 H382c 2015
  • Clinical neurophysiology board review Q & A Puneet K. Gupta, MD, MSE, Pradeep Modur, MD, MS, Srikanth Muppidi WL 18.2 G959c 2014
  • Coherence policy markers for psychoactive substances Richard Muscat, Brigid Pike, members of the Coherent Policy Expert Group, Pompidou Group. HV 5840 E85 M971c 2014
  • Diagnostic pathology. Normal histology [edited by] Laura W. Lamps. QS 504 D540 2013
  • Drugs in pregnancy and lactation: a reference guide to fetal and neonatal risk Gerald G. Briggs, Roger K. Freeman. QV 4 B854d 2015
  • Ebola: the natural and human history of a deadly virus David Quammen. WC 534 Q256e 2014
  • Elsevier’s medical laboratory science examination review [edited by] Linda J. Graeter, Elizabeth G. Hertenstein, Charity E. Accurso, Gideon H. Labiner. QY 18.2 El76 2015
  • Geriatric dosage handbook: including clinical recommendations and monitoring guidelines. Senior editors : Todd P. Semla, Judith L. Beizer, Martin D. Higbee. QV 735 S472g 2015
  • Handbook of hepato-pancreato-biliary surgery edited by Nicholas J. Zyromski. WI 39 H255 2015
  • History of allergy, volume editors Karl-Christian Bergmann, Johannes Ring. WD 300 H62911 2014
  • Intolerant bodies: a short history of autoimmunity Warwick Anderson and Ian R. Mackay. WD 305 An231i 2014
  • Introductory textbook of psychiatry, Donald W. Black, 1956- WM 100 A557k 2014
  • The little SAS book: a primer : a programming approach Lora D. Delwiche and Susan J. Slaughter. QA 276.4 D389l 2012
  • Manipulating the mouse embryo: a laboratory manual Richard Behringer, Marina Gertsenstein, Kristina Vintersten Nagy, Andras Nagy. QL 959 M246 2014
  • Medical school scholarships, grants & awards: insider advice on how to find and win scholarships Samir P. Desai, M.D. [and 5 others]. W 20 D441m 2015
  • Pediatric & neonatal dosage handbook: a universal resource for clinicians treating pediatric and neonatal patients Carol K. Taketomo, PharmD, Jane Hurlburt Hodding, PharmD, Donna M. Kraus, FAPhA, FPPAG, FCCP. QV 735 P371g 2014
  • Pharmacology success: a Q & A review applying critical thinking to test taking Ray A. Hargrove-Huttel, RN, PHD [and] Kathryn Cadenhead Colgrove, RN, MS, CNS QV 18.2 H223p 2014
  • Physician assistant examination review: pearls of wisdom editor-in-chief, Daniel Thibodeau ; associate editor, Scott H. Plantz. W 18.2 P569 2014
  • PTEXAM: the complete study guide Scott M. Giles. WB 460 G391p 2015
  • Robbins and Cotran Review of pathology Edward C. Klatt, MD, Vinay Kumar, MBBS, MD, FRCPath QZ 18.2 K63r 2015
  • Surgical recall Recall series editor and senior editor, Lorne H. Blackbourne. WO 18.2 S9619 2015
  • Understanding celiac disease: an introduction for patients and caregivers Naheed Ali WD 175 Al41u 2014
  • Wallach’s Interpretation of diagnostic tests: pathways to arriving at a clinical diagnosis.

Resource spotlight: Ebooks

The McGoogan Library owns or provides access to a growing collection of ebooks in the health sciences. In most cases, the library will not purchase the print version of books for which we have electronic access.  We offer many ways of using and viewing our ebooks.  If you know the title, ISBN, publisher, or vendor of an ebook, you can search for it directly in our Ebook A-Z list.

Ebooks are generally only available via the web interface, not devices such as Kindles. Some publishers and vendors do provide specific apps for viewing content from a mobile device. You can view a table of these options and more from our ebook library guide.

Access to PDFs also vary and sometimes require a personal logon, such as in the case of Clinical Key. If you have any questions or have problem with our ebooks please contact the AskUs desk at 402-559-6221 or askus@unmc.edu.

Retaining your author rights

Your article has been accepted for publication in a journal and, like your colleagues, you want it to have the widest possible distribution and impact in the scholarly community. In the past, this required print publication. Today you have other options, like online archiving, but the publication agreement you’ll likely encounter will actually prevent broad distribution of your work.

According to the traditional publication agreement, all rights, including copyright, go to the journal. You probably want to include sections of your article in later works. You might want to give copies to your class or distribute it among colleagues. And you likely want to place it on your Web page or in an online repository if you had the choice. These are all ways to give your research wide exposure and fulfill your goals as a scholar, but they are inhibited by the traditional agreement. If you sign on the publisher’s dotted line, is there any way to retain these critical rights?

Transferring copyright doesn’t have to be all or nothing. The law allows you to transfer copyright while holding back rights for yourself and others. An author amendment was approved by the University of Nebraska Medical Center Faculty Senate April 2010.  All authors of the University of Nebraska are welcome to attach this amendment to their publisher agreements or copyright transfer.  It is not a requirement, but a recommendation for authors to retain key rights.  The prime purpose of the amendment is to help authors who are uncomfortable negotiating contract terms with publishers. Because the amendment is merely a proposed contract modification, a publisher may accept or reject it. You may negotiate for all or any one of the rights.

Scrutinize the Publication Agreement

  • Read the publication agreement with great care. Publishers’ agreements (often titled “Copyright Transfer Agreement”) have traditionally been used to transfer copyright or key use rights from author to publisher. They are written by publishers and may capture more of your rights than are necessary to publish the work. Ensuring the agreement is balanced and has a clear statement of your rights is up to you.
  • Publishing agreements are negotiable. Publishers require only your permission to publish an article, not a wholesale transfer of copyright. Hold onto rights to make use of the work in ways that serve your needs and that promote education and research activities.
  • Value the copyright in your intellectual property. A journal article is often the culmination of years of study, research, and hard work. The more the article is read and cited, the greater its value. But if you give away control in the copyright agreement, you may limit its use. Before transferring ownership of your intellectual output, understand the consequences and options.

What if the publisher rejects the author amendment?

  • Explain to the publisher why it is important for you to retain these rights in your own work.
  • Ask the publisher to articulate why the license rights provided under the UNMC Author Amendment are insufficient to allow publication.
  • Evaluate the adequacy of the publisher’s response in light of the reasonable and growing need for authors to retain certain key rights to their works.
  • Consider publishing with an organization that will facilitate the widest dissemination of their authors’ works, to help them fulfill their personal and professional goals as scholars.

How to use the UNMC Author Amendment

  1. Print out, sign and date the Author Amendment. The corresponding author can sign on behalf of all authors.
  2. Staple the Author Amendment to the publisher’s agreement or copyright transfer form.
  3. Write “Subject to attached amendment” below your signature on the publisher’s copyright transfer or publication agreement form. This phrase along with your signature serves to inform the publisher that you accept the publisher’s agreement only if the publisher accepts the attached Author Amendment.
  4. Make copies of all the forms for your records.

 

Adapted from Author Rights: using the SPARC Author Addendum to secure your rights as an author of a journal article.

Easily find articles on specific groups with Embase

By Roxanne Cox

Embase has many named groups to aid in your searching.  Using the thesaurus called Emtree you can pinpoint your search results to named groups such as ethnic groups, citizen groups, marital status, occupation, geographic or population groups.

In 2014, 300 new terms were added for ethnic and citizen groups, making it possible for searchers to highlight almost any ethnic or citizen group mentioned in Embase articles. Please note that the named group must be a significant factor of the article to be assigned a term. Citizen groups range from Nauruan to Palauan to EU citizen to Tajik to Eritrean and ethnic groups include groups such as the Caddoan people, Seminole or Turkmen.

Emtree has more preferred terms with over 60,000 compared to PubMed/Medline’s 26,000 terms.  For your next search consider using Embase, which also includes Medline.

If you have any questions concerning databases,  search strategies, or would like to request that an Education and Research Service librarian assist you with a search please contact us at askus@unmc.edu.