McGoogan News

Class registration: predatory publishing, systematic reviews, and citation managers

To support your research and writing, the library is offering the following three classes. Registration is required and sessions will be livestreamed and made available in our video archive.

Predatory Publishers and Open Access

Instructor: Emily J. Glenn, MSLS

This session focuses on selecting a scientific or biomedical journal for publication of research articles. Presenters will demonstrate how to use library resources like Scopus and Journal Citation Reports along with reference checklists to evaluate journals. We will address salient characteristics of potentially predatory journals as well as core tenets of open access, often conflated with predatory publishing. Participants will review real website of potentially predatory publishers and share strategies for selecting journals in their disciplines.

October 13, 2017, MSC 1005, 12:00pm – 1:00pm (Livestream available)
REGISTER

Systematic Reviews: What’s It All About?
Instructors: Roxanne Cox and Emily Glenn

This session will provide participants with an understanding of the systematic review process and standards and describe the benefits of including librarians on their teams.

  • Panelists from College of Public Health, College of Nursing, and College of Medicine will share their experiences working with systematic review teams and advice for those who are newer to systematic reviews.
  • Librarians will discuss their role as systematic review team members, describe services the library provides, and outline how to get started.

October 25, WH8011, 11:30am – 12:30pm (Livestream available)
REGISTER

 

Intro to Citation Managers – EndNote, RefWorks, Mendeley, & Zotero

Instructors: Emily J. Glenn, MSLS and Cindy Schmidt, MD, MLS

Get to know these four popular bibliographic citation management program and decide which is best to use with your individual and collaborative projects. In this session, we will demonstrate the strongest features of these four programs, demonstrate collection and organization of citations and PDFs, and review output and full-text linking.

October 30, DRC1006, 3:30pm – 4:20pm
REGISTER

October 31, WH8011, 12:00pm – 1:00pm (Livestream available)
REGISTER

 

Writing Center open for the semester

The Writing Center @ UNMC,, staffed by the University of Nebraska Omaha and housed within the library,  is open for the semester. Students, faculty, and staff are welcome to work with a writing consultant on any writing project on Wednesdays and Thursdays from 2pm to 7 pm.. This free service is appropriate for writing assignments, application essays, business letters, or other projects. Please see The Writing Center site for more information and to book an appointment. Online appointments are also available. The Writing Center is sponsored by Academic Affairs.

Preprints: Where to Post and How to Cite

By Emily Glenn

The National Institutes of Health recently shared a notice about reporting preprints and interim research products in NIH award applications and reports: Reporting Preprints and Other Interim Research Products (NOT-OD-17-050) (https://grants.nih.gov/grants/guide/notice-files/NOT-OD-17-050.html). This guide advises authors that they may include publicly available preprints and interim research products–which cite NIH awards–in their NIH report materials. Preprints and interim research products are not required to be publicly posted or to be reported.

What are Preprints?
Preprints, often called e-prints, are a complete and public draft of a scientific document, typically unreviewed manuscripts, written in the style of a peer-reviewed journal article. Researchers post preprints to speed dissemination, establish priority, obtain feedback, and offset publication bias. Preprints are not indexed in literature databases.

Where Can Preprints be Posted?
Authors may choose post preprints on discipline-specific preprint servers, such as bioRxiv, arXiv, or PsyArXiv, or on sites like Figshare.

BioRxiv, a preprint server for articles covering all aspects of research in the life sciences, is hosted by Cold Spring Harbor Laboratory. Each paper posted to bioRxiv is assigned a preprint DOI (papers with journal-issued DOIs cannot be submitted.) Readers may add public comments to articles on bioRxiv.

ArXiv.org, operated by the Cornell University Library, hosts preprints in physicis, mathematics, computer science, and quantitative biology, finance, and statistics. DOIs are not assigned in ArXiv, so users should also plan on posting their preprints directly to a site like Figshare to obtain a DOI.

PsyArXiv is an interactive digital repository for papers on psychological science. DOIs are assigned at upload.

Figshare is a site that allows users to upload any file format and display that content in a browser. Figshare is especially useful for posters, presentations, datasets and code–items that are challenging to disseminate in a way that current scholarly publishing models allow. DOIs are assigned at upload.

Wherever items are posted, authors must still follow publisher requirements regarding sharing works prior final publication. Many publishers allow some version of scholarly articles to be posted in the author’s institutional repository. Permissions for many publishers can be found at SHERPA RoMEO (http://www.sherpa.ac.uk/romeo). The library can assist authors with selecting a Creative Commons (http://creativecommons.org) license that allows authors to retain copyright.

Identifying predatory publishers

In this age of open access publishing, where authors to retain copyright and removes the paywall to potential readers, one must be aware that not all open access publishers are the same. Predatory publishers—those who distribute content solely to make money from article processing charges (APCs) –have little regard for peer review and what researchers typically expect from scholarly publishing processes.

But, how can you tell if a journal publisher is potentially predatory? It is a challenge: journal titles and publisher names are similar, reputable-looking articles front the website, and editorial boards looks to be full of experts from reputable institutions. You may have even received an invitation to submit a paper, complete with the convincing “hook” of knowledge about your work or field.

An article recently published in BMC Medicine tackles the issue of spotting the difference between potential predatory and legitimate biomedical journals. It highlights the typical characteristics of predatory journals, such as broad scope, errors in grammar and spelling, no retraction policy for submissions, and little or no mention of copyright. (All 13 characteristics are outlined in Table 10 of the article.)

In addition to these, consider whether a journal is indexed in MEDLINE, Scopus, or other major databases and whether all fees are clearly disclosed. Authors should look at the journal and publisher critically. The library’s Author Toolkit guide provides some pointers.

If you have questions about the quality of a journal, librarians can help. Please contact the AskUs Desk at 402-559-6221 or askus@unmc.edu for assistance.