McGoogan News

Library Account PINS

Beginning fall 2017, the McGoogan Library of Medicine is enabling patrons to view their accounts online.  When you look up items in the library’s catalog, there is a Login button in the upper right hand corner.  If you have checked out library item(s) previously, contact askus@unmc.edu or 402-559-4006 and request a PIN.

Once you have a PIN, you can view items you have checked out and request a renewal of your item(s).

Please note: If you have never checked out an item from the library, you will need to come in person with your UNMC photo ID. We will create an account for you.

If you have any questions, please contact askus@unmc.edu or call 402-559-4006.

Finding books formerly found in ClinicalKey

By Deborah Divis

The McGoogan Library of Medicine is acquiring print editions of the most heavily used and requested titles to replace the recently cancelled subscription to ClinicalKey. As they arrive, these new Reference books are shelved on the 6th floor near the AskUs desk.

Discover these titles through an alphabetical listing or browse by category in the research guide, Print Titles Formerly Accessible through Clinical Key. This guide indicates which books are already here and which books are still on order.

For more information about accessing the new books, or even older editions available for checkout, please stop by the Library or contact the AskUs desk at (402) 559-4006.

Feedback sought on collection cancellations

By Alison Bobal

The McGoogan Library of Medicine would like your feedback on planned reductions to the library’s collections.

Our reduction target is $325,000, 16% of the library’s overall expenditures on collections. Each year the library faces inflationary costs of our electronic resources (i.e. ebooks, databases and journals), plus a steadily rising cost of print books. These inflationary rates average around 10%, with some databases going as high as 18%. In years past we made some cuts to our collections and relied on endowments to help offset inflation. We are now at a point where our budget and endowments can no longer absorb these inflationary costs. Additionally, a budget reduction of 1.9% for FY16 makes cancellations unavoidable.

In addition to making cuts to the library’s collection, we are also developing long-term strategies that aim to meet the expanding educational curricula and research programs on campus, investigating new ways to acquire and deliver content, and exploring potential new revenue sources.

We’ve done a thorough analysis of our collections expenditures and have identified resources for cancellation. Our analysis included usage stats and content overlap. The resources we’ve identified for cuts cover books, journals, and databases.

Additional information can be found in our frequently asked questions.

Books

Due to the budget pressure, we will be drastically limiting the number of books we purchase. The only books added this year may be new editions of some core titles and individual requested titles. Electronic books typically cost more than print books so to help reduce expenditures, any books we do purchase will be primarily in print.

Ebook titles that are up for cancellation come from two resources: ClinicalKey and Stat!Ref (a full list of these ebooks can be found here). These 1,141 ebook titles constitute about 16% of our ebook collection.

Journals

The 1,300 journal title cancellations primarily come from three resources/packages: Sage, ClinicalKey and Health Business Elite. There are also additional titles that are individual subscriptions. All of these titles represent 15% of our current journal collection. A full list of journal cancellations can be found here.

Databases

Please send comments and questions to Alison Bobal at abobal@unmc.edu by August 31, 2015.

Summer reading … with the library

By Dawn Wilson

The summer isn’t over yet! You can set aside those heavy textbooks, but that doesn’t mean that there’s nothing of interest for you at the library. These might not be your traditional “beach reads”, but who says you can’t be engrossed in a bookSummer Reading and learn something at the same time?

Your summer reading list at McGoogan might look something like this:

Movies and Mental Illness: Using Films to Understand Psychopathology by Danny Wedding – Explaining mental disorders using films like A Clockwork Orange, It’s a Wonderful Life, and Kill Bill.

1 Dead in Attic: After Katrina by Chris Rose – Essays and articles on the year and a half following Hurricane Katrina.

The Three Christs of Ypsilanti by Milton Rokeach – When three patients suffer the same delusions, their caregivers bring them to the same mental health facility to see what happens when confronted by other men who think they’re Christ.

The Toadstool Millionaires: A social history of patent medicines in America before Federal regulation by James Harvey Young – Hucksters, quacks, and the placebo effect.

Popular Medicines: An Illustrated History by Peter G Homan – Retrospective history of medicines peddled by chemists, illustrated with original full-color ads, tins, and bottles including Bile Beans, Lion Ointment, and Gripe Water.

Cows, Pigs, Wars, and Witches: The Riddles of Culture by Marvin Harris – Answers to some of the more eccentric questions in anthropology and sociology.

The Pit: A Group Encounter Defiled by Gene Church – What started like any other 1970’s business retreat designed to teach bonding and leadership turns dark when the men in charge see how far people will go for a promotion.

Tulipmania: The story of the world’s most coveted flower and the extraordinary passions it aroused by Mike Dash – Economic boom and destruction, caused by a flower.

Salem Possessed: The Social Origins of Witchcraft by Paul Boyer and Stephen Nissenbaum

Lewis & Clark: Doctors in the Wilderness by Bruce C. Paton, M.D.  – What medicine was available in the early 1800s during a wilderness expedition?

The True History of the Elephant Man by Michael Howel & Peter Ford

Medical Spanish by Gail L. Bongiovanni – Phrases and vocabulary.

Plagues and Peoples by William H. McNeill – Modern and historical diseases from the bubonic plague through Ebola.

Photographic History of Civil War Injuries: Photographs of Surgical Cases and Specimens: Otis Historical Archives by Bradley P. Bengtson, M.D. & Julian E. Kuz, M.D. – After the Civil War, patients were invited to Washington D.C. to have their healed injuries photographed.

Leonardo da Vinci on the Human Body: The Anatomical, Physiological, and Embryological Drawings of Leonardo da Vinci by Charles D. O’Malley and J. B. de C. M. Saunders – Copies of da Vinci’s manuscript pages and drawings are included in this book with translations.