McGoogan News

Speaker on diversity September 27

Dr. Hassan A. Tetteh, MD, MBA, FACS, FACHE, will present Embracing Diversity for Improved Health Outcomes to the UNMC community on September 27, 2017 at noon in MSC 2014.

Dr. Tetteh is Command Surgeon at the National Defense University, Associate Professor at the Uniformed Services University of the Health Sciences, adjunct faculty at Howard University College of Medicine, and served as Division Lead for Futures and Innovation at Navy Medicine’s Headquarters, Bureau of Medicine and Surgery. Dr. Tetteh specializes in cardiovascular disease management, heart failure surgery, and heart and lung transplantation.  He serves on social impact organizations such as:

  • Champions for Kids, a nonprofit dedicated to positively transforming the lives of children
  • Mentoring in Medicine, to inspire the next generation of health professionals
  • Arthur Ashe Institute for Urban Health , which collaborates with community members to design, incubate and replicate neighborhood-based interventions that address health conditions that disproportionately affect minorities.

Take time out in the Reflection Room

We are firmly in the new semester and stresses can increase. Take a moment or two to visit the Reflection Room. The room is available for students, faculty, and staff to carry out quiet meditation or reflection. The room holds displays of art that will rotate periodically, soft lighting, and comfortable cushions and mats for meditation. A massage chair is also available in the room.  Contemplative music selections are available for access via QR code on your mobile device. The Reflection Room is located on the 8th floor of the McGoogan Library of Medicine in room 8016A and is open to all during regular library hours. No reservations are required. The room was made possible by funding from the Department of Psychiatry,

McGoogan Library additionally has a Wellness Corner on the northwest side of the 6th floor. A massage chair, large-format relaxing images, a coloring station, and wellness-themed books on relaxation techniques, yoga, and managing stress are available. Relaxing song and music recommendations are also available in this area via QR code on your mobile device.

Class registration: predatory publishing, systematic reviews, and citation managers

To support your research and writing, the library is offering the following three classes. Registration is required and sessions will be livestreamed and made available in our video archive.

Predatory Publishers and Open Access

Instructor: Emily J. Glenn, MSLS

This session focuses on selecting a scientific or biomedical journal for publication of research articles. Presenters will demonstrate how to use library resources like Scopus and Journal Citation Reports along with reference checklists to evaluate journals. We will address salient characteristics of potentially predatory journals as well as core tenets of open access, often conflated with predatory publishing. Participants will review real website of potentially predatory publishers and share strategies for selecting journals in their disciplines.

October 13, 2017, MSC 1005, 12:00pm – 1:00pm (Livestream available)
REGISTER

Systematic Reviews: What’s It All About?
Instructors: Roxanne Cox and Emily Glenn

This session will provide participants with an understanding of the systematic review process and standards and describe the benefits of including librarians on their teams.

  • Panelists from College of Public Health, College of Nursing, and College of Medicine will share their experiences working with systematic review teams and advice for those who are newer to systematic reviews.
  • Librarians will discuss their role as systematic review team members, describe services the library provides, and outline how to get started.

October 25, WH8011, 11:30am – 12:30pm (Livestream available)
REGISTER

 

Intro to Citation Managers – EndNote, RefWorks, Mendeley, & Zotero

Instructors: Emily J. Glenn, MSLS and Cindy Schmidt, MD, MLS

Get to know these four popular bibliographic citation management program and decide which is best to use with your individual and collaborative projects. In this session, we will demonstrate the strongest features of these four programs, demonstrate collection and organization of citations and PDFs, and review output and full-text linking.

October 30, DRC1006, 3:30pm – 4:20pm
REGISTER

October 31, WH8011, 12:00pm – 1:00pm (Livestream available)
REGISTER

 

Predatory journals in PubMed?

It has been reported in the journal literature and on scholarly publishing blogs that PubMed contains articles from predatory journals. In short, articles from potentially predatory publishers may appear in PubMed, although they are not part of MEDLINE. 

We turn to PubMed as an authoritative source for biomedical literature, so what happened? Simply put, there is a “backdoor” for getting journals listed in PubMed. PubMed is the publicly accessible platform of the MEDLINE database from the National Library of Medicine. However, PubMed is also a portal for finding PubMed Central articles in journals that are not indexed in MEDLINE. When searching MEDLINE on platforms such as Ovid, Scopus, or EBSCO, you are likely searching only MEDLINE, depending on your search filters. In PubMed, by default, you are searching MEDLINE and PubMed Central together, in addition to other collections.  When you see the [Indexed for MEDLINE] tag below the abstract, you can tell that an article is from a publication indexed in MEDLINE, such as this one. Very new records will not have this tag, but may be from a journal indexed in MEDLINE. You can also see if a journal is indexed in MEDLINE by looking it up in the NLM catalog.

If you have questions about MEDLINE or searching the biomedical literature, contact a librarian.

From the archives: University Hospital interne staff 1920

By John Schleicher

The College of Medicine’s University of Nebraska Hospital opened 100 years ago, in September 1917.  The various buildings that housed the hospital remain on the campus today, located between Wittson Hall and the Durham Outpatient Center, and surrounded on all sides by other buildings.  In 1996-1997, University Hospital merged with Clarkson Hospital, to form the basis of what is now Nebraska Medicine.

By the 1920s, the internship had become recognized nationally as an essential part of medical education.  Though not originally a formal requirement, post-medical school internships became an accepted and necessary step in the preparation for medical practice.  University of Nebraska Hospital had interns for 12-month assignments, beginning as early as 1920 (see image).

University Hospital Interne staff 1920

By 1927, University Hospital was accepting interns for an 18-month service. During this time, the young physicians rotated through seven departments. Two months were spent in each of five areas—pathology, drug room and anesthetics, radiology and physical therapy, pediatrics, and obstetrics and gynecology, where the intern acted as house physician in the admitting department. In addition, the intern spent four months in each of the two major areas, medicine and surgery. Dr. Albert F. Tyler’s 1928 book, History of Medicine in Nebraska, noted, “This internship is not excelled anywhere in the country in the general training given and opportunities offered by a service in a teaching hospital.”