McGoogan News

Who in the library…faculty & staff profiles

Evelyn Reinthaler
Library Technician II
Education & Research Services

Tell us about your job in the library.

What I do for the McGoogan Library is both circulation and reference assistance.  I also work on special projects that are assigned to me.

When would you most likely meet or talk with me?

You would most likely see me at the desk in the evenings and weekends.

What do you like about working in the library?

The thing I like most about working in the library is being able to work with an intelligent, talented staff and also to be able to help the students who bring a lot of joy to my job.

What do you like to do outside of work?

What I like to do outside of the library is read.  I am a collector of first editions and autographed books, I also collect FBI Most wanted posters.  I am currently working on a Master’s degree in Criminology and Criminal Justice.

Pet therapy event April 26

Pet Therapy 1920 x 1080

The McGoogan Library will be hosting a Pet Therapy event on Tuesday April 26th, 2016. This event will take place outside of the Sorrell Center at the Sorrell Commons Area from 11:30am-1:00pm. Take a break from studying and come see us. Coloring pages, along with coloring pencils, and popcorn will be provided.

The Pet Therapy event will be held in memory of Steve Bridges. Steve worked at the library for nearly 30 years and was well liked by students and staff at UNMC. He was a strong believer about going the extra mile to relieve stress for students when they needed it the most.

On campus library resource access to change

On April 29, 2016 access to the majority of library electronic resources will require authentication while on-campus. Although this may seem like an inconvenience, it’s a necessary step to ensure compliance with our licenses. Fortunately the username and password you will use to authenticate is the same as your UNMC NetID.

Because of the large number of licensed resources, moving access to this new setup will occur throughout the week beginning April 25, 2016 with the targeted end date of Friday April 29. If you have any questions, please contact Alison Bobal at abobal@unmc.edu.

Search tip: PubMed Clinical Queries

By Alissa Fial

MEDLINE via PubMed has advanced features to help users to get more specific results.  One of these features, Clinical Queries, can be found under PubMed Tools on the PubMed Page.

Clinical Queries helps users look for the filters by specific clinical research areas: Clinical Study Categories, Systematic Reviews or Medical Genetics.

For step-by-step instructions, see the following guide.

From the archives: Irving Cutter, M.D.

By John Schleicher

Irving Cutter, M.D., was born in 1875 in New Hampshire, and as a boy he came to Nebraska with his family.  He graduated from the University of Nebraska-Lincoln in 1898. For six years following graduation he worked as a high school teacher and principal. He graduated from the University of Nebraska College of Medicine in 1910, at age 35. After graduation Cutter practiced medicine in Lincoln for three years, and was also an instructor in physiological chemistry at the University of Cutter_Irving_S_1925Nebraska. In 1913 Cutter became professor of biochemistry at the University of Nebraska College of Medicine.

Dr. Cutter became Dean of the University of Nebraska College of Medicine in 1915, and served in this capacity until 1925.  He then became Dean of Medicine at Northwestern University Medical School in Chicago. Cutter remained at Northwestern University for 16 years, retiring in 1941. While at Northwestern University, Dr. Cutter also acted as Medical Director of Passavant Hospital in Chicago.

Beginning in 1934, Cutter was medical editor for the Chicago Tribune, writing a daily column on health called “How to Keep Well.” The various topics of his columns cover a wide range of medical topics, from diabetes to poison ivy, and worry as a cause of heart disease to hardening of the arteries.

Cutter served in World War I as a Captain in the Medical Corps of the U.S. Army from 1918-1919, and held the rank of Lieutenant Colonel in the Officers’ Reserve Corps from 1920-1929. In 1923 Cutter was elected president of the Association of American Medical Colleges. He was president of Phi Rho Sigma from 1927-1934. He died in 1945, at age 69, of prostate cancer.