McGoogan News

Unpaywall: a browser extension to help you find free full-text

Have you ever found an interesting article online and were faced with a paywall? Now you can quickly find out if there is a version of the article, freely available. The Unpaywall browser extension, compatible with Chrome and Firefox, makes finding these versions quick and easy. It helps you identify open access articles, whether they are the final version of record or a pre or post print. Either way, you get the content for free. Read more about it in the Unpaywall FAQ.

As always, UNMC faculty, students, and staff can search the library’s online journals to access thousands of journals.

 

Upcoming library classes – register now!

Plan on attending one of the upcoming presentations scheduled for The McGoogan Sessions. Please register here: https://www.unmc.edu/library/services/classes/index.html , and indicate if you wish to attend the noon presentations through Vidyo.

On April 18, “Publishing Demystified”, will be presented twice at different times and locations on campus. Learn the basics of journal publication processes, from authorship to making your work available. This session will address selecting a journal for your paper, evaluating copyright transfer agreements, and will provide an overview of traditional and alternative metrics.

First presentation will be held at Noon-1pm in the McGoogan Library, Wilson Training Room, WH8011

Second presentation will be held at 3:30pm-4:20pm in the Durham Research Center, DRC1006

In June, The McGoogan Sessions presents “Getting the Most From Google – Advanced Tips & Tools”. Take your Google searches to the next level.  Learn to use using available tags. tools and operators to focus your Google or Google Scholar searches on your area of interest.  Customize your Google Scholar settings to obtain full-text and facilitate citation export.   Learn about other specialized Google search engines, including Google Images and Google Translate.

First presentation will be held at Noon-1pm in the McGoogan Library, Wilson Training Room, WH8011

Second presentation will be held at 3:30pm-4:30pm in the College of Public Health, MCPH3001

 

Preprints: Where to Post and How to Cite

By Emily Glenn

The National Institutes of Health recently shared a notice about reporting preprints and interim research products in NIH award applications and reports: Reporting Preprints and Other Interim Research Products (NOT-OD-17-050) (https://grants.nih.gov/grants/guide/notice-files/NOT-OD-17-050.html). This guide advises authors that they may include publicly available preprints and interim research products–which cite NIH awards–in their NIH report materials. Preprints and interim research products are not required to be publicly posted or to be reported.

What are Preprints?
Preprints, often called e-prints, are a complete and public draft of a scientific document, typically unreviewed manuscripts, written in the style of a peer-reviewed journal article. Researchers post preprints to speed dissemination, establish priority, obtain feedback, and offset publication bias. Preprints are not indexed in literature databases.

Where Can Preprints be Posted?
Authors may choose post preprints on discipline-specific preprint servers, such as bioRxiv, arXiv, or PsyArXiv, or on sites like Figshare.

BioRxiv, a preprint server for articles covering all aspects of research in the life sciences, is hosted by Cold Spring Harbor Laboratory. Each paper posted to bioRxiv is assigned a preprint DOI (papers with journal-issued DOIs cannot be submitted.) Readers may add public comments to articles on bioRxiv.

ArXiv.org, operated by the Cornell University Library, hosts preprints in physicis, mathematics, computer science, and quantitative biology, finance, and statistics. DOIs are not assigned in ArXiv, so users should also plan on posting their preprints directly to a site like Figshare to obtain a DOI.

PsyArXiv is an interactive digital repository for papers on psychological science. DOIs are assigned at upload.

Figshare is a site that allows users to upload any file format and display that content in a browser. Figshare is especially useful for posters, presentations, datasets and code–items that are challenging to disseminate in a way that current scholarly publishing models allow. DOIs are assigned at upload.

Wherever items are posted, authors must still follow publisher requirements regarding sharing works prior final publication. Many publishers allow some version of scholarly articles to be posted in the author’s institutional repository. Permissions for many publishers can be found at SHERPA RoMEO (http://www.sherpa.ac.uk/romeo). The library can assist authors with selecting a Creative Commons (http://creativecommons.org) license that allows authors to retain copyright.

Identifying predatory publishers

In this age of open access publishing, where authors to retain copyright and removes the paywall to potential readers, one must be aware that not all open access publishers are the same. Predatory publishers—those who distribute content solely to make money from article processing charges (APCs) –have little regard for peer review and what researchers typically expect from scholarly publishing processes.

But, how can you tell if a journal publisher is potentially predatory? It is a challenge: journal titles and publisher names are similar, reputable-looking articles front the website, and editorial boards looks to be full of experts from reputable institutions. You may have even received an invitation to submit a paper, complete with the convincing “hook” of knowledge about your work or field.

An article recently published in BMC Medicine tackles the issue of spotting the difference between potential predatory and legitimate biomedical journals. It highlights the typical characteristics of predatory journals, such as broad scope, errors in grammar and spelling, no retraction policy for submissions, and little or no mention of copyright. (All 13 characteristics are outlined in Table 10 of the article.)

In addition to these, consider whether a journal is indexed in MEDLINE, Scopus, or other major databases and whether all fees are clearly disclosed. Authors should look at the journal and publisher critically. The library’s Author Toolkit guide provides some pointers.

If you have questions about the quality of a journal, librarians can help. Please contact the AskUs Desk at 402-559-6221 or askus@unmc.edu for assistance.

3D Printing in Medicine Seminar Series April 5 & 18

The UNMC Makers Club will host experts in 3D printing and project development to speak about their research. All are invited to join in the discussion!

Dr. Bin Duan, Internal Medicine
April 5, 2017, 12-12:50pm, MSC 2014

Dr. Jesse Cox, Pathology
April 18, 2017, 12-12:50pm, MSC 2010

Lunch is provided (first come, first served).

This seminar series is sponsored by UNMC Student Senate. Questions? Contact the Makers Club 3Dmakers@unmc.edu