McGoogan News

Login issues when accessing the library off-campus

Some users have reported getting an “invalid username or password” message when trying to access library resources from off-campus. If you encounter this problem, go to http://net.unmc.edu/netid and change your password. Be sure to check the box next to “Do not change Active Directory password”. If you continue to have problems accessing library resources, please contact us at librarycd@unmc.edu

Google Scholar Result Export to RefWorks, EndNote, Zotero, and others

If you use a citation manager like RefWorks, EndNote or Zotero; saving a Google Scholar search result in your citation manager’s database is as simple as clicking a link. Getting the needed links to appear in your search results takes a little bit of work, however.

To get an “import” link to appear in each Google Scholar search result:

Go to Google Scholar  http://scholar.google.com

Click on the “menu” icon (three, stacked, horizontal lines)

 

 

 

 

 

Find and click on the “Settings”/”Cogwheel” icon. The cogwheel may be at the bottom of the list of options or above the other options.

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

Use the “Bibliography manager” drop-down to make the appropriate selection.

If you are using Zotero or Mendeley, select the “RefMan” option which will produce a RIS-format file.  Zotero preferences can be set to automatically import any downloaded RIS files.

 

 

 

 

 

 

Click the “Save” button.

Conduct a Google Scholar search.

An “Import into Refworks,” “Import into RefMan,” or “Import into EndNote” link will be present under each Google Scholar search result.  You can either click this link, or, if you want a citation manager record that is unlikely to need editing, follow the instructions below to import a record from PubMed.

 

 

 

 

 

If you want to import a record from PubMed that is unlikely to require editing:

Click the “All ___ versions” link.

Google Scholar aggregates all sources for a search result in one “hit” or search result.   If you look at the screenshot above, you’ll see that 16 different websites provided   this search result (see dotted arrow.  A PubMed record for this article is probably one of the 16 sources.

When you reach the page showing the different versions of the search result, look for a “version” that was retrieved from “nlm.nih.gov” (see red underline in screenshot below). This is the PubMed version.  Click on the “Import into ______” link under this version of the search result.

From the archives: ancient Persian baby feeders

By John Schleicher

The Alberts Collection contains over 150 rare and historic infant feeding devices, baby bottles, and other associated items.  The infant feeders date from an ancient Persian clay feeding pot circa 100-200 B.C., to mid-to-late twentieth century glass and plastic baby bottles.  The collection includes various types of feeders, such as nursing flasks, pap boats and bubby pots.

Iranian feeding pot, 100-200 BC

The collection was assembled by M. E. Alberts, M.D. (born 1923), during his career as a pediatrician in Des Moines, Iowa.  Dr. Alberts is originally from Hastings, Nebraska, and is a 1948 graduate of the University of Nebraska College of Medicine.  Many of the artifacts in the library’s special collections were gifts from UNMC alumni.

The two oldest items in the collection are both ancient Persian feeding pots made of clay.  The older of the two is from the northern part of Iran, at a place called Mazandaran, by the Caspian Sea.  It is approximately 2000 years old, from circa 100-200 B.C.

Iranian Feeding Pot, Circa 250 A.D.

The other Persian feeding pot was excavated in the city of Ghazvin, Iran.  It is approximately 1700 years old, from circa 250 A.D.  According to the University Museum at the University of Pennsylvania, it is “like the Parthian-Sassanid pottery.”  These dates and other information about the two pots are from Dr. Alberts’ handwritten notes concerning his collection.

To see more artifacts from the Alberts collection, as well as archival materials and historic photos of the UNMC campus, visit the special collections page at DigitalCommons@UNMC.