McGoogan News

3D Printing in Medicine Seminar Series

The UNMC Makers Club will host experts in 3D printing and project development to speak about their research. All are invited to join in the discussion!

Gabe Linke, Children’s Hospital 3D Printing Coordinator
February 21, 2017, 12-12:50pm, MSC 2014

Dr. Donny Suh, Truhlsen Eye Institute
March 1, 2017, 12-12:50pm, MSC 4053

Dr. Jorge Zuniga, UNO Biomechanics
March 14, 2017, 12-12:50pm, MSC 2014

Dr. Bin Duan, Internal Medicine
April 5, 2017, 12-12:50pm, MSC 2014

Dr. Jesse Cox, Pathology
April 18, 2017, 12-12:50pm, MSC 2010

Lunch is provided (first come, first served). This seminar series is sponsored by UNMC Student Senate. Questions? Contact the Makers Club 3Dmakers@unmc.edu

 

From the archives: Early Public Health in Omaha

By John Schleicher

Omaha was founded in 1854, as soon as Nebraska Territory opened to settlement.  It was formally incorporated as a city on February 2, 1857, and was the territorial capital.  In 1855, the first physician in the city, Dr. George Miller, “busied himself in public city health matters.”  One of the first few ordinances passed by the new city government dealt with a public health issue—the disposal of dead animal carcasses that lay in the often very muddy streets.  Over the ensuing years, city leaders continued to concern themselves with public health out of necessity.

The March 1894 edition of the “Monthly Report of the Department of Health, Omaha” (see image), was still reporting the number and type of dead animals removed from the streets and from public and private property, which included horses, mules, cows, dogs, cats, colts, calves, and hogs.  This publication also listed communicable diseases reported in the city, including diphtheria, scarlet fever, measles, typhoid fever, diarrheal diseases, small pox, whooping cough, and puerpural sepsis.

At the granting of statehood, on March 1, 1867, the capital was removed to the new town of Lincoln, further west.  The local governments of both the City of Omaha and Douglas County continued to be aware of and concerned about the health of their citizens.  The library’s archives hold monthly reports of the Omaha Department of Health from March 1894 to 1903, and monthly and annual reports from 1938-1947, called the Health Bulletin, from the Omaha Bureau of Health.   Later, there was a health agency known as the Omaha-Douglas County Health Department.  The first Douglas County Hospital opened in 1887, and a City Emergency Hospital opened in 1912.

 

Search tips: New Embase search form

By Roxanne Cox

Embase has a new and easy to use quick search form with multiple search lines that let you restrict your search to specific fields, such as title, journal name, country of journal, country of author, conference name and many other useful fields.  The new search form easily allows limiting retrieval to evidence based medicine with limits to Cochrane Reviews, systematic reviews, meta-analysis, randomized control trial or controlled clinical trial.

Embase covers the international biomedical literature from 8500 peer-reviewed journals from 1947 to the present.  Over 30% of the journals covered are unique and not covered by PubMed/Medline.

 

Librarian office hours across campus

Now through May 5, McGoogan Library is expanding its in-person librarian office hours across the UNMC Omaha campus. All faculty, staff, and students can visit librarians at the following locations and receive immediate help with using library resources and searching for the evidence.

College of Allied Health Professions: Wednesdays, 9:30-11am, 2nd floor Sorrell Atrium across from the convenience store

College of Medicine: Wednesdays, 9:30-11am, 2nd floor Sorrell Atrium across from the convenience store

College of Nursing: Tuesdays, 11am-1pm, College of Nursing Science Building, 3rd floor atrium

College of Pharmacy: Wednesdays, 9:30-11am, 2nd floor Sorrell Atrium across from the convenience store

College of Public Health: Tuesdays, 3-5pm, 2nd floor front lobby of the COPH

Research: Thursdays, 10am-Noon, DRC Commons

Library class: Getting Started with EndNote

Learn how to get started collecting and organizing information using EndNote, a powerful tool for organizing and managing bibliographic references. This workshop will help you learn how to collect references from the library’s databases and other online sources, organize items into folders, select output styles, and format references in your document by using EndNote’s Cite While You Write program.

If you have a laptop with EndNote installed, please feel free to bring it. Otherwise, this class will consist of demonstrations.

Feb 14, WH8011, Noon-1pm REGISTER

Feb 16-DRC1006, 3:30-4:20pm REGISTER