Jefferson Science Fellowships

The contribution of state-of-the-art science, technology, and engineering (STE) to the formulation and implementation of U.S. government policy, both domestic and foreign, has been recognized throughout the second half of the 20th-century as a critical element in reaching sound, comprehensive conclusions that reflect “good governance.” Without an accurate, timely understanding of rapidly advancing STE issues, it is increasingly difficult to identify and establish sound governmental policy that effectively meets the needs of modern societies. The articulation of “accurate science for statecraft” to policy makers has become an essential element in establishing effective international relationships in the 21st century.

Recognizing this need, the Secretary of State announced, on October 8, 2003, the Jefferson Science Fellows (JSF) program at the U.S. Department of State, establishing a new model for engaging the American academic science, technology, engineering and medical communities in the formulation and implementation of U.S. foreign policy. The JSF program is administered by the National Academies and supported through a partnership between the U.S. academic community, professional scientific societies, the U.S. Department of State and the U.S. Agency for International Development (USAID).

The Jefferson Science Fellowship is open to tenured, or similarly ranked, faculty from U.S. institutions of higher learning who are U.S. citizens. The application period opens each fall and closes in mid-January. Selected Jefferson Science Fellows spend one year on assignment at the U.S. Department of State or USAID as science advisors on foreign policy issues. Assignments are tailored to the needs of the hosting office, while taking into account the Fellows’ interests and areas of expertise. As part of their assignments, Jefferson Fellows also have the opportunity to travel to U.S. embassies and missions overseas. At the conclusion of the fellowship year, and upon return to their home institution, Fellows continue to serve as a resource to the State Department and USAID for an additional five years.

For the 2014 program year, it is expected that the U.S. Department of State and USAID will host up to 15 Jefferson Science Fellows; the fellowship begins in mid-August.  Visit the How to Apply page to view eligibility criteria, terms of the fellowship and instructions for applying.

View the Jefferson Science Fellowship Brochure here.

Robert Wood Johnson Foundation Health Policy Fellows

Proposal Deadline: November 13, 2013 (3:00 p.m.)

The Robert Wood Johnson Foundation Health Policy Fellows program provides the nation’s most comprehensive fellowship experience at the nexus of health science, policy and politics in Washington, D.C. It is an outstanding opportunity for exceptional midcareer health professionals and behavioral and social scientists with an interest in health and health care policy promoting the health of the nation. Fellows participate in the policy process at the federal level and use that leadership experience to improve health, health care and health policy.

Damon Runyon-Sohn Pediatric Cancer Fellowship Award

The Damon Runyon Cancer Research Foundation, the leading charity supporting innovative young cancer researchers, and the Sohn Conference Foundation, dedicated to curing pediatric cancers, partnered to establish the Damon Runyon-Sohn Pediatric Cancer Fellowship Award. This award provides funding to basic scientists and clinicians who conduct research with the potential to significantly impact the prevention, diagnosis or treatment of one or more pediatric cancers. Applicants are not required to be pediatricians or members of pediatric departments; however, the proposed research must have direct relevance to one or more pediatric cancers. The goal of this Fellowship Award is to recruit the top young minds to research childhood cancers. It leverages the success of the internationally-renowned Damon Runyon Fellowship Award, which has an unparalleled track record for identifying future breakthrough scientists.  The primary criteria used to evaluate applicants are: 
• potential impact of the research on pediatric cancer
• the quality of the research proposal (importance of the problem, originality of approach, appropriateness of techniques and clarity of presentation)
• the qualifications, experience and productivity of both the candidate and the Sponsor
• the quality of the research training environment in which the proposed research is to be conducted and its potential for broadening and strengthening the candidate’s ability to conduct innovative and substantive research

The award is $50,000 per year for three years for basic scientists; $60,000 per year for three years for physician scientists. In addition, an annual $2,000 expense allowance is awarded to the laboratory in which the Fellow is working and can be used by the Fellow for his/her educational and scientific expenses. The Foundation also provides a Dependent Child Allowance of $1,000 per child per year. The award may not be used for institutional overhead or indirect costs. 

Application deadline: March 15, 2013  
Please visit www.damonrunyon.org for eligibility and application guidelines.