February 26, 2014 – “Collaborative International Research – a priority for the NIH and an exciting challenge for U.S. investigators.”

Gray Handley, MSPH

Gray Handley, MSPH

College of Public Health Grand Rounds
Wednesday, February 26, 2014
12:00-1:00 pm
MCPH 3013

“Collaborative International Research – a priority for the NIH and an exciting challenge for U.S. investigators.” Presented by Frank Gray Handley Jr., MSPH, Associate Director for International Research Affairs, National Institute of Allergy and Infectious Diseases.

Objectives:

1. NIH and its current Global Health Mission

2. Different NIH Institutes engaged and interested in International Health

3. Essential factors for consideration for establishing a successful international collaboration

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February 19, 2014 – “The Growing Public Health Challenges of Antimicrobial Resistance (AR).”

Kurt B. Stevenson, MD, MPH

Kurt B. Stevenson, MD, MPH

College of Public Health Grand Rounds
Wednesday, February 19, 2014
12:00-1:00 pm
MCPH 3013 

“The Growing Public Health Challenges of Antimicrobial Resistance (AR).”  Presented by Kurt B. Stevenson, MD, MPH, Associate Professor of Medicine and Epidemiology, Division of Infectious Diseases, Ohio State University.

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February 5, 2014 – “Vitamin D and Health of School-Age Children: News from the Tropics.”

 

Eduardo Villamor, MD, MPH, DrPH

Eduardo Villamor, MD, MPH, DrPH

College of Public Health Grand Rounds
Wednesday, February 5, 2014 

“Vitamin D and Health of School-Age Children: News from the Tropics.” Presented by Eduardo Villamor, MD, MPH, DrPH, Associate Professor, Epidemiology, School of Public Health, University of Michigan.

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December 4, 2013 – “Mathematical Modeling of Systems Pharmacogenetics Towards Personalized Drug Delivery.”

Rongling Wu, Ph.D.

Rongling Wu, Ph.D.

College of Public Health Grand Rounds
Wednesday, December 4, 2013

“Mathematical Modeling of Systems Pharmacogenetics Towards Personalized Drug Delivery.”  Presented by Rongling Wu, Ph.D., Professor of Biostatistics and Bioinformatics, Pennsylvania State University

Objectives:

  1. Integrate mathematical modeling of drug reactions into pharmacogenomics
  2. Predict interpersonal differences in drug response based on genetic information
  3. Develop a strategy for personalized drug delivery.

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November 20, 2013 – “Crowdsourcing: Expanding Collaboration from Organizations into Communities.”

Gert-Jan de Vreede, PhD

Gert-Jan de Vreede, PhD

College of Public Health Grand Rounds
Wednesday, November 20, 2013 

“Crowdsourcing: Expanding Collaboration from Organizations into Communities.”  Presented by Gert-Jan de Vreede, PhD, The Center for Collaboration Science, University of Nebraska at Omaha

Objectives:
1.         Introduce the crowdsourcing phenomenon as the future of collaboration
2.         Provide examples how crowdsourcing creates value in medical/public health settings
3.         Discuss opportunities for interdisciplinary crowdsourcing research

 

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October 30, 2013 – “Ventilation and the Transport of Bioaerosols in Healthcare Environments.”

K.R. Grosskopf, PhD

K.R. Grosskopf, PhD

College of Public Health Grand Rounds
Wednesday, October 30, 2013

“Ventilation and the Transport of Bioaerosols in Healthcare Environments.” Presented by K.R. Grosskopf, PhD, Associate Professor of Engineering, University of Nebraska-Lincoln and Terry Stentz, Ph.D., MPH, CPE, CPC, Associate Professor of Engineering, University of Nebraska-Lincoln

Terry Stentz, Ph.D.

Terry Stentz, Ph.D.

Hospitals are among the most energy intensive buildings in the U.S., using more than two-thirds of total energy consumption to maintain climate control and indoor air quality (IAQ).  In spite of this, hospital acquired infections (HAIs) claim more than 90,000 lives and cost more than $US 20 billion each year.  As a result, a series of tests were conducted in an actual hospital to observe containment and removal of synthetic respiratory aerosols (0.3-10.0µm) with respect to directional airflow and ventilation rate within a general patient room, an airborne infectious isolation room (AIIR) and corridor.  Ventilation rates were not found to be effective in proportionately reducing aerosol concentrations within patient rooms.  Specifically, increasing outdoor air (OA) ventilation from 2.5 to 5.5 air changes per hour (ACH) reduced aerosol concentrations only 25-30% on average.  Directional airflow (≥2.5Pa), however, was found to be effective in containing aerosol transport from patient rooms to adjacent corridors.  Within corridors, aerosols ≤3.0µm were found capable of migrating distances exceeding 31m (100ft).  Door position, door motion and personnel movement were also found to have a significant effect on air pressure relationships and subsequent aerosol containment.  The results of this case study, when compared to other similar studies, may identify optimal levels of ventilation that maximize airborne infection control while minimizing energy use.

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