Rohan Jadhav

Rohan Jadhav

Rohan Jadhav

Student Highlight – Rohan Jadhav is a PhD student in the Department of Environmental, Agricultural and Occupational Health. He is from Mumbai, India, and has finished the first year of his doctoral program. Rohan earned an undergraduate degree in Ayurvedic Medicine and Surgery from Maharashtra University of Health Sciences, Nashik, India. After finishing his medical training, Rohan worked as a family physician for two years in his hometown, Dombivali, a suburb near Mumbai. While working as a physician, he gradually realized that although one-on-one medical consultation is important, it is not enough to improve the health of a community and that public health research and advocacy was also necessary. With this understanding, Rohan decided to pursue higher education in public health and moved to the United States for training in public health science and research at Missouri State University, where he earned an MPH degree. During an internship at Linn County Public Health, Cedar Rapids, Iowa, Rohan was exposed to a variety of public health disciplines and experienced how these disciplines worked hand in hand. This experience expanded his view of public health practice in the United States.

Rohan’s interest in injury and disease prevention and in teaching healthy behaviors motivated him to pursue doctoral education in Environmental, Health, Occupational Health, and Toxicology at the College of Public Health (COPH) of the University of Nebraska Medical Center. His dissertation is focused on risk factors in agricultural injuries. Agriculture is one of the most dangerous industries in the United States and in many parts of the world. Farmers are exposed to various dangers, including hazardous machinery, large animals, and working on large bins. The complex nature of farming makes it difficult for farmers to avoid these exposures, putting them at risk of fatal and non-fatal injuries. Rohan is working to identify the factors that elevate injury risk so that researchers can target specific populations with appropriate interventions.

Rohan is also interested in risk evaluation of exposures that are generally considered safe. One such exposure is to the smoke created by electrocautery during surgery. Rohan is working to evaluate the risk of pollutants in the surgical smoke. Rohan hopes that in the future, his expertise in environmental and occupational health and medicine will enable him to improve the health outcomes of communities across the United States and in India.

Rohan finds the learning atmosphere at UNMC highly encouraging to students, noting that faculty and staff have been very helpful and attentive. He also observes that the abundant resources for research in public health set the UNMC COPH apart from other institutions