McGoogan News

Resource spotlight: SciFinder

By Alison Bobal

SciFinder provides access to the world’s most comprehensive and authoritative source of substances, reactions and references (including journals and patents) in chemistry and related sciences. The content is updated daily so you can be sure you have the most timely and accurate information available. You can search SciFinder by keywords, names, publications, natural language, reaction pathways, chemical structures, and many others.

  • Get substances – access the world’s most trusted resource for substance information including chemical structures, chemical names, CAS Registry Numbers, properties, commercial availability and regulatory information.
  • Get reactions – find dependable and current chemical reaction information including reaction schemes, experimental procedures, conditions, yields, solvents, catalysts, as well as commercial availability of substances.
  • Get references – get the information you need when you need it with SciFinder’s collection of the world’s most up-to-date chemistry and related science information found in journals, patents, dissertations and more. SciFinder is the only source that brings you information from early discovery through clinical trials with the combined coverage of CAplus and MEDLINE.

Resource spotlight: IEEE Xplore Digital Library

UNMC now has access to the IEEE Xplore Digital Library due to a licensing agreement with UNL and UNO. IEEE Xplore includes full-text journals, conference proceedings and standards in areas such as Biomedical Engineering, Biometrics, Imaging, Medical Devices and Nanotechnology.

There are 174 IEEE Journals, Transactions, Letters and Magazines with a complete backfile to 1988 and archival content to Volume 1, Issue 1 for many titles. More than 1,400 IEEE Conference Proceedings and more than 2,800 IEEE Standards are also included in IEEE Xplore.

You can browse the journals, conference proceedings or standards or search across all of the IEEE Xplore content using keywords, author name, publication title or citation information.

Collection cancellations announced

By Alison Bobal

The McGoogan Library of Medicine has finalized this year’s cuts to the Library’s collection. We appreciated all of the comments we received in August about the pending cancellations. Unfortunately, we still have a budget shortfall based on the current inflation rate for databases, journals, and ebooks. The Library is unable to keep most things that were on the potential cancellation list.

The Library is working on solutions so we do not experience as high of a reduction next year. We are identifying new revenue sources and partners in acquiring content. For more information go to

Access to cancelled resources will continue until December 31, 2015.


Two resources that include many ebooks will be cancelled: ClinicalKey and Stat!Ref. Of the 1,140 titles that will be cancelled, the Library has about 26% of the same titles (same edition) in print. A small pool of funds will be set aside to purchase print copies for 82 of the highly used and requested titles from ClinicalKey. Unfortunately we will not be able to purchase these titles in ebook format due to cost. For the titles in ClinicalKey, the average cost of the ebook is about 4.5x the print cost, with some titles nearly 8x the print cost. A list of the cancelled ebook titles can be found here.


678 journal titles will be cancelled. Most of these titles come as part of Health Business Elite (506 titles) and ClinicalKey (161 titles). 11 titles come from individual subscriptions. A few highly used and requested journals from ClinicalKey will be converted to individual subscriptions (i.e. American Journal of Medicine, Clinical Gastroenterology and Hepatology, Heart Rhythm, Pediatric Clinics of North America). You can order articles from most cancelled journals through McGoogan Docs, the Library’s free document delivery service. A list of the cancelled journal titles can be found here.

Other Cancelled Resources

Retained Collections

This year we will be assessing our collections and will be following up with students and faculty on their specific needs.

Resource spotlight: Acland’s Video Atlas of Human Anatomy

By Alison Bobal

Acland’s Video Atlas includes over 300 narrated videos of real cadaver specimens that were not stiffened or discolored by embalming. The videos use rotating specimens that lets you see them as three-dimensional objects.

In each part of the body, the Video Atlas starts with structures that give you the foundation for your understanding. The bones are shown first, then joints and their movements, then the muscles, and then the blood vessels and nerves. This is the reverse of the order that is seen in dissection, where the foundation is not understood until the end.

The Video Atlas content can be searched by anatomical regions and parts. Run times are listed for each part. You can start, stop, and pause at any time while viewing a video, as well as jump to specific parts using the expanded table of contents. At the end of each region of the body, there is a brief review section which recaps the important structures for test preparation and knowledge reinforcement.

The Video Atlas platform also includes exams modules. You can use the exam feature two ways: the “review mode”, which does not limit the time per question and the correct answer is displayed after your response or the “exam mode”, which has a 60-second limit per question and the correct answers are provided upon exam completion. At the end of the “exam mode” you will be presented with a recommended viewing list based on your performance.

Feedback sought on collection cancellations

By Alison Bobal

The McGoogan Library of Medicine would like your feedback on planned reductions to the library’s collections.

Our reduction target is $325,000, 16% of the library’s overall expenditures on collections. Each year the library faces inflationary costs of our electronic resources (i.e. ebooks, databases and journals), plus a steadily rising cost of print books. These inflationary rates average around 10%, with some databases going as high as 18%. In years past we made some cuts to our collections and relied on endowments to help offset inflation. We are now at a point where our budget and endowments can no longer absorb these inflationary costs. Additionally, a budget reduction of 1.9% for FY16 makes cancellations unavoidable.

In addition to making cuts to the library’s collection, we are also developing long-term strategies that aim to meet the expanding educational curricula and research programs on campus, investigating new ways to acquire and deliver content, and exploring potential new revenue sources.

We’ve done a thorough analysis of our collections expenditures and have identified resources for cancellation. Our analysis included usage stats and content overlap. The resources we’ve identified for cuts cover books, journals, and databases.

Additional information can be found in our frequently asked questions.


Due to the budget pressure, we will be drastically limiting the number of books we purchase. The only books added this year may be new editions of some core titles and individual requested titles. Electronic books typically cost more than print books so to help reduce expenditures, any books we do purchase will be primarily in print.

Ebook titles that are up for cancellation come from two resources: ClinicalKey and Stat!Ref (a full list of these ebooks can be found here). These 1,141 ebook titles constitute about 16% of our ebook collection.


The 1,300 journal title cancellations primarily come from three resources/packages: Sage, ClinicalKey and Health Business Elite. There are also additional titles that are individual subscriptions. All of these titles represent 15% of our current journal collection. A full list of journal cancellations can be found here.


Please send comments and questions to Alison Bobal at by August 31, 2015.