McGoogan News

Harry Potter’s World exhibit

In 1997, British author J. K. Rowling introduced the world to Harry Potter and a literary phenomenon was born. Millions of readers have followed Harry to the Hogwarts School of Witchcraft and Wizardry where he discovers his heritage, encounters new plants and animals, and perfects his magical abilities. Although a fantasy story, the magic in the Harry Potter books is partially based on Renaissance traditions that played an important role in the development of Western science, including alchemy, astrology, and natural philosophy. Incorporating the work of several 15th- and 16th-century thinkers, the seven-part series examines important ethical topics such as the desire for knowledge, the effects of prejudice, and the responsibility that comes with power.

This exhibition, using materials from the National Library of Medicine, explores Harry Potter’s world, its roots in Renaissance science, and the ethical questions that affected not only the wizards of Harry Potter, but also the historical thinkers featured in the series.

Visit Harry Potter’s World in the McGoogan Library of Medicine, August 4 – September 13.

You can visit the online exhibit at http://www.nlm.nih.gov/exhibition/harrypottersworld

This exhibition is brought to you by the National Library of Medicine, National Institutes of Health, and was curated by Elizabeth J. Bland.

Davis lecture on April 24

Poynter Hall’s place in the history of medical education is the focus of the sixth Richard B. Davis, M.D., Ph.D. History of Medicine Lecture. Medical education experienced a revolution in the late 19th and early 20th century, and the buildings erected during that time reflected the new focus on scientific medicine and experiential learning.

Built in 1913, Poynter Hall was the first home of the University of Nebraska College of Medicine on the new campus at 42nd and Dewey.  It is among eight medical schools covered in the lecture, along with:  Johns Hopkins, Harvard, Vanderbilt, Syracuse, Howard, Woman’s Medical College of Pennsylvania, and Columbia University’s College of Physicians and Surgeons.

The lecture will look at how funding influenced architectural developments, as well as how public-private partnerships supported medical school construction.  Under the leadership of Abraham Flexner, M.D., a particular building type was emphasized, and the work of Boston architectural firm Shepley, Rutan, & Coolidge was promoted.  They became the premier architectural firm specializing in medical schools in this period.  Flexner was the author of the landmark 1910 report Medical Education in the United States & Canada: a Report to the Carnegie Foundation for the Advancement of Teaching.

Who: Katherine L. Carroll, Ph.D., adjunct professor at Seton Hall University, will discuss this transformational history of medical school architecture. Her lecture is titled, “Grandeur Consolidated: The Original Poynter Hall in Architectural Context.”

Dr. Carroll is an architectural historian whose research focuses on institutional architecture with an emphasis on medical schools. She received her B.A. in art history from Williams College, and completed her M.A. and recently her Ph.D. in the history of art and architecture at Boston University. Dr. Carroll is in the process of revising her dissertation for publication as a book with the working title, Building Schools, Making Doctors: Architecture and the Coming-of-Age of American Physicians.

What: The Richard B. Davis, M.D., Ph.D., History of Medicine Lectureship brings national experts to the UNMC campus to discuss the history of medicine, in support of special collections at the McGoogan Library, including rare books and works on the history of medicine. The lectureship is supported through an endowed fund given by the late Richard B. Davis, M.D., Ph.D. (1926-2010), professor emeritus of internal medicine at UNMC, and his wife, Jean.  Davis supported this lectureship out of his long-standing interest in the history of medicine; he was a faculty member at UNMC from 1969-1994.

When: 12 Noon, Thursday, April 24. Lunch will be provided for the first 100 attendees starting at 11:30 a.m.

Where: Eppley Science Hall Amphitheater Room 3010

Davis History of Medicine lecture April 15

The McGoogan Library of Medicine
invites you to attend the annual
Richard B. Davis, M.D., Ph.D.
History of Medicine Lecture

A Brief & Necessarily Incomplete
Overview of Blood Transfusion
Throughout the Ages

- guest lecturer –
Leo J. McCarthy,
M.D., F.R.C.P. Edin/Ire

University of Nebraska College of Medicine Class of 1964
Professor Emeritus, University of Indiana, School of Medicine
Indianapolis, Indiana

12:00 noon, Monday, April 15, 2013

Eppley Science Hall Amphitheater Room 3010
Lunch will be provided to the first 100 attendees
beginning at 11:30 a.m.

Davis lecture on Sickle Cell Disease to be held March 26

The McGoogan Library of Medicine
invites you to attend the annual
Richard B. Davis, M.D., Ph.D.
History of Medicine Lecture

Race, Medicine, Authorship & the “Discovery” of Sickle Cell Disease 1910 – 1911

- guest lecturer -
Todd L. Savitt, Ph.D.
Department of Bioethics & Interdisciplinary Studies
Brody School of Medicine, East Carolina University
Greenville, North Carolina

Noon, Monday, March 26, 2012

Eppley Science Hall Amphitheater
Room 3010

Lunch will be provided to the first 80 attendees.

History of teaching hospitals (Davis Lecture April 11)

Susan Lawrence, Ph.D.

During the April 11 Richard B. Davis, M.D., Ph.D., History of Medicine Lecture at UNMC, explore how charity patients became teaching objects and how seven major London hospitals evolved to become medical schools.

Susan Lawrence, Ph.D., associate professor of history at the University of Nebraska-Lincoln, will discuss these and other topics during the lecture.

When: 4 p.m.

Where: Mary Ann “Maisie” Paustian Amphitheater, Room 3001 in the Sorrell Center. A reception will follow in the Linder Reading Room, also in the Sorrell Center.

What: The lecture is sponsored by the McGoogan Library of Medicine and supported through an endowed fund created in 2008 by the late Dr. Davis, professor emeritus of internal medicine at UNMC, and his wife, Jean.

Dr. Davis created the lectureship to illustrate the impact of key scientific findings and to support special collections at the McGoogan Library, including works on the history of medicine.

Who: Dr. Lawrence is coordinator of the Humanities in Medicine Program, which offers an interdisciplinary minor to undergraduates interested in health care in its social context.