McGoogan News

From the archives: A man-mid-wife?

Man midwife

By John Schleicher

At the end of the 18th century, some male doctors began to build their medical practices by assisting normal births, previously the exclusive sphere of women. A controversy raged in Britain and America about these new man-midwives. The controversy over doctors assisting with childbirth continued throughout the 19th century and into the early 20th, as home births were decreasing and hospital births were on the rise.

The illustration is from Man-midwifery dissected: or, the obstetric family-instructor; for the use of married couples, and single adults of both sexes, by Samuel William Fores, published in London in 1793. The man-mid-wife cartoon depicts one view of the controversy in the form of a “Monster,” a half-male, half-female midwife. The text below the illustration, an advertisement for the book, says:

“A Man-Mid-Wife: or a newly discovered animal . . . for a more full description of this Monster, see an ingenious book, lately published . . . ‘Man-Midwifery dissected, containing a variety of well authenticated cases elucidating this animal’s propensities to cruelty & indecency, sold by the publisher of this print, who has presented the author with the above for a Frontispiece to his book.”

To see more works on obstetrics visit the library’s rare book rooms. Contact the Special Collections Department at 402-559-7094 to set up a tour or inquire at the AskUs desk.

Davis Lecture explores American childbirth, April 23

By John Schleicher

The history of childbirth in the United States will be the focus of the 7th Annual Richard B. Davis, M.D., Ph.D. History of Medicine Lecture, to be held at noon on April 23 in the Eppley Science Hall Amphitheater (room 3010).

The guest speaker is Judith Leavitt, Ph.D., professor emerita in the department of medical history at the University of Wisconsin, Madison.

The title of Dr. Leavitt’s lecture is “From ‘Brought to Bed’ to ‘Alone among Strangers': Medical and Social Issues in American Childbirth History.” She will focus on the late 19th and early 20th centuries, including the transition from home births to hospital births. Dr. Leavitt is author or co-author of several books including “Brought to Bed: Childbearing in America, 1750 to 1950,” and her most recent work “Make Room for Daddy: The Journey from Waiting Room to Birthing Room.”

Dr. Leavitt’s major research interests are 19th and 20th century public health and women’s health. Her other publications include: “The Healthiest City: Milwaukee and the Politics of Health Reform” and “Typhoid Mary: Captive to the Public’s Health.”

She has edited “Sickness and Health in America” and “Women and Health in America,” and she chaired the department of medical history and bioethics at UW for 11 years. She was associate dean for faculty in the UW School of Medicine and Public Health for four years. She was president of the American Association for the History of Medicine from 2000-2002.

Box lunches provided for the first 75 attendees starting at 11:30 a.m. The McGoogan Library of Medicine is hosting the event.

The Richard B. Davis, M.D., Ph.D., History of Medicine Lectureship brings national experts to the UNMC campus to discuss the history of medicine, in support of special collections at the McGoogan Library, including rare books and works on the history of medicine. The lectureship is supported through an endowed fund given by the late Richard B. Davis, M.D., Ph.D. (1926-2010), professor emeritus of internal medicine at UNMC, and his wife, Jean. Davis supported this lectureship out of his long-standing interest in the history of medicine; he was a faculty member at UNMC from 1969-1994.

Where can I find books… in the library?

The library has books in many locations. This blog article can help you with these locations. You can always stop at the Ask Us Desk for directions.

The library has books in many locations. This blog article can help you with these locations. You can always stop at the Ask Us Desk for directions.

By Dawn Wilson

With the McGoogan Library spread over three floors, it can be difficult to find what you need in an unfamiliar library. Here’s a mini-tour to help you out.

Sixth Floor

This catalog says this book is located on Reserve: Reserve items are located at the Ask Us Desk. They can be used inside the library only, and only for 2 hours at a time. These are books placed for course reserves by your professors.

Isn’t that the same thing as Reference?: Reference books include the newest human atlases, the OED, Directory of Physicians, and drug facts books. They’re located just across from the Ask Us Desk on the wooden shelves. Reference books cannot leave the library, but at least you know they are always here when you need them!

What about Review Books?: We have an entire section of review books to help you study for exams and rotations (ie: USMLE, Step 2, Psychiatry), from different publishers: Pearls of Wisdom, Lange, First Aid, Case Files, Pre-Test, NMS, BRS, and many more. Review and Residency Books are located in the same wooden shelving area as the Reference books. These books are popular, so they can only be checked out for 1 week at a time with 1 renewal.

How about New Books?: New books stay on display for 2 weeks, just to let people know what’s new!

Seventh Floor

When are books located in the Books?: Older books or books not needed for specific courses are located in our regular collection (handily called “Books” in the online catalog). These can be checked out for 2 weeks with 2 renewals.

Didn’t the Journals used to be split alphabetically?: Yes, but now our journals are all located on the 7th floor. They’re still shelved alphabetically by journal title, though.

I’m looking for a UNMC Thesis or Dissertation: Hard-copy theses are located at the top of the stairs, right in front of the Journals.

Eighth Floor

I need a really old thesis, or a really, really old book: You’ll need to make an appointment to get into our Archives (402-559-7094). We have theses going back to the early 1900s, we have a History of Medicine area carrying books too fragile for the shelves, and we also have two Rare Book Rooms with items published during the last several hundred years. These items can be viewed on-site only. More information is available here.

Resource spotlight: Educational literature in ERIC

Looking for articles related to education and instruction? Are your usual go-to databases not working out? Search the ERIC database instead. ERIC stands for the Education Resources Information Center and contains over 1.5 million records. These resources include journal articles, books, conference proceedings, dissertations, and so much more.

Access ERIC under the Literature Databases section of the library’s Quick Links.

Summer reading “sale” at the library

By Dawn Wilson

The school year is almost over, and for some, that means finally, a little time to relax! Whether you’re planning to spend a few days at the beach, or take a long flight overseas, you’re going to need a good book to take with you. We’ve got you covered! Just visit our leisure reading “sale” and browse literary, sci-fi/fantasy, romance, non-fiction, children’s books, picture books, cookbooks, memoirs, magazines, and even some DVDs and CDs.

The McGoogan Library uses the “sale” to raise money for Fontenelle Elementary School. They’re our adopted school library, located in north Omaha, and every year, we buy exciting brand-new books to fill their library.

The sale will start April 6 and run six weeks, through the end of the semester. It’s located on the 6th floor, near the Ask Us desk.

If you have donations that you have found lingering under beds during spring cleaning, by all means, bring them up! We will continue to take donations throughout the sale.

Book “sales” are by donation only.