New books added in April

  • Basic biostatistics : statistics for public health practice B. Burt Gerstman. WA 950 G383b 2015
  • Care of military service members, veterans, and their families edited by Stephen J. Cozza, Matthew N. Goldenberg, Robert J. Ursano. WB 116 C2711 2014
  • Designing clinical research Stephen B. Hulley, MD, MPH, Steven R. Cummings, MD, Warren S. Browner, MD, MPH, Deborah G. Grady, MD, MPH, Thomas B. Newman, MD, MPH. WA 950 D457 2013
  • The doctor wore petticoats: women physicians of the old West Chris Enss. WZ 150 E599d 2006
  • Epidemiology: study design and data analysis Mark Woodward. WA 950 W899e 2014
  • Health care USA: understanding its organization and delivery Harry A. Sultz, Kristina M. Young. W 84 AA1 S964h 2014
  • Health sciences literature review made easy: the matrix method Judith Garrard WZ 345 G238h 2014
  • High-yield gross anatomy Ronald W. Dudek, Thomas M. Louis. QS 18.2 D845h 2015
  • Medieval medicine: the art of healing, from head to toe Luke Demaitre. WZ 54 D369m 2013
  • Pharmacotherapy: a pathophysiologic approach [edited] by Joseph T. DiPiro, Robert L. Talbert, Gary C. Yee, Gary R. Matzke, Barbara G. Wells, L. Michael Posey. WB 330 P5357 2014
  • Polio wars: Sister Elizabeth Kenny and the golden age of American medicine Naomi Rogers WZ 100 R7241p 2014
  • The RDA workbook: learning the basics of Resource Description and Access Margaret Mering, editor Z 694.15 R47 2014
  • Wounded: a new history of the Western Front in World War I Emily Mayhew. WZ 112 M469w 2013

Davis lecture on April 24

Poynter Hall’s place in the history of medical education is the focus of the sixth Richard B. Davis, M.D., Ph.D. History of Medicine Lecture. Medical education experienced a revolution in the late 19th and early 20th century, and the buildings erected during that time reflected the new focus on scientific medicine and experiential learning.

Built in 1913, Poynter Hall was the first home of the University of Nebraska College of Medicine on the new campus at 42nd and Dewey.  It is among eight medical schools covered in the lecture, along with:  Johns Hopkins, Harvard, Vanderbilt, Syracuse, Howard, Woman’s Medical College of Pennsylvania, and Columbia University’s College of Physicians and Surgeons.

The lecture will look at how funding influenced architectural developments, as well as how public-private partnerships supported medical school construction.  Under the leadership of Abraham Flexner, M.D., a particular building type was emphasized, and the work of Boston architectural firm Shepley, Rutan, & Coolidge was promoted.  They became the premier architectural firm specializing in medical schools in this period.  Flexner was the author of the landmark 1910 report Medical Education in the United States & Canada: a Report to the Carnegie Foundation for the Advancement of Teaching.

Who: Katherine L. Carroll, Ph.D., adjunct professor at Seton Hall University, will discuss this transformational history of medical school architecture. Her lecture is titled, “Grandeur Consolidated: The Original Poynter Hall in Architectural Context.”

Dr. Carroll is an architectural historian whose research focuses on institutional architecture with an emphasis on medical schools. She received her B.A. in art history from Williams College, and completed her M.A. and recently her Ph.D. in the history of art and architecture at Boston University. Dr. Carroll is in the process of revising her dissertation for publication as a book with the working title, Building Schools, Making Doctors: Architecture and the Coming-of-Age of American Physicians.

What: The Richard B. Davis, M.D., Ph.D., History of Medicine Lectureship brings national experts to the UNMC campus to discuss the history of medicine, in support of special collections at the McGoogan Library, including rare books and works on the history of medicine. The lectureship is supported through an endowed fund given by the late Richard B. Davis, M.D., Ph.D. (1926-2010), professor emeritus of internal medicine at UNMC, and his wife, Jean.  Davis supported this lectureship out of his long-standing interest in the history of medicine; he was a faculty member at UNMC from 1969-1994.

When: 12 Noon, Thursday, April 24. Lunch will be provided for the first 100 attendees starting at 11:30 a.m.

Where: Eppley Science Hall Amphitheater Room 3010